ludicrous


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

lu·di·crous

 (lo͞o′dĭ-krəs)
adj.
So absurd or incongruous as to be laughable. See Synonyms at foolish.

[From Latin lūdicrus, sportive, from lūdus, game; see leid- in Indo-European roots.]

lu′di·crous·ly adv.
lu′di·crous·ness n.

ludicrous

(ˈluːdɪkrəs)
adj
absurd or incongruous to the point of provoking ridicule or laughter
[C17: from Latin lūdicrus done in sport, from lūdus game; related to lūdere to play]
ˈludicrously adv
ˈludicrousness n

lu•di•crous

(ˈlu dɪ krəs)

adj.
causing or deserving laughter because of absurdity; ridiculous; laughable: a ludicrous lack of efficiency.
[1610–20; < Latin lūdicer sporting, in fun, derivative of lūdicrum amusement, derivative of lūd(ere) to play]
lu′di•crous•ly, adv.
lu′di•crous•ness, n.

ludicrous

- Early senses of ludicrous, from the adjective ludic, were "sportive," "intended as jest" and "spontaneously playful."
See also related terms for jest.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.ludicrous - broadly or extravagantly humorous; resembling farce; "the wild farcical exuberance of a clown"; "ludicrous green hair"
humorous, humourous - full of or characterized by humor; "humorous stories"; "humorous cartoons"; "in a humorous vein"
2.ludicrous - incongruous;inviting ridicule; "the absurd excuse that the dog ate his homework"; "that's a cockeyed idea"; "ask a nonsensical question and get a nonsensical answer"; "a contribution so small as to be laughable"; "it is ludicrous to call a cottage a mansion"; "a preposterous attempt to turn back the pages of history"; "her conceited assumption of universal interest in her rather dull children was ridiculous"
foolish - devoid of good sense or judgment; "foolish remarks"; "a foolish decision"

ludicrous

ludicrous

adjective
Translations
مُضحِك، مُثير للضِّحْك
naprosto směšný
komplet latterlig
älytönnaurettava
fáránlegur
jocīgssmieklīgs
çok aptalcagülünçkomik

ludicrous

[ˈluːdɪkrəs] ADJridículo, absurdo

ludicrous

[ˈluːdɪkrəs] adj [situation, idea, claim] → ridicule, absurde
it is ludicrous to suggest that ... → il est ridicule de dire que ...
it's ludicrous that ... → il est ridicule que ...

ludicrous

adjgrotesk; sight, wordslächerlich; idea, suggestionhaarsträubend; (= low) prices, wages, speedlächerlich, lachhaft; (= high) prices, wages, speedunerhört, haarsträubend; don’t be ludicrous, I can’t do it that fastdas is ja grotesk, so schnell kann ich das nicht (machen); I’ve done the most ludicrous thing!mir ist etwas Haarsträubendes passiert!

ludicrous

[ˈluːdɪkrəs] adjridicolo/a, assurdo/a

ludicrous

(ˈluːdikrəs) adjective
completely ridiculous.
ˈludicrously adverb
ˈludicrousness noun
References in classic literature ?
In the aspect of this dark-arrayed, pale-faced, ladylike old figure there was a deeply tragic character that contrasted irreconcilably with the ludicrous pettiness of her employment.
An officer formerly attached to a king's household, whose business it was to amuse the court by ludicrous actions and utterances, the absurdity being attested by his motley costume.
The variety of matter, indeed, which I shall be obliged to cram into this book, will afford no room for any of those ludicrous observations which I have elsewhere made, and which may sometimes, perhaps, have prevented thee from taking a nap when it was beginning to steal upon thee.
As, in the serious style, Homer is pre-eminent among poets, for he alone combined dramatic form with excellence of imitation, so he too first laid down the main lines of Comedy, by dramatising the ludicrous instead of writing personal satire.
It's really ludicrous; her object is doing good; she a Christian, yet she's always angry; and she always has enemies, and always enemies in the name of Christianity and doing good."
I was told, almost in the same words, of the same ludicrous habit among the Caffres; the Australians, likewise, have long been notorious for being able to imitate and describe the gait of any man, so that he may be recognized.
I never go out after dark, but I find myself in the ludicrous situation of being followed and observed at a distance, always by one scout, and often by two.'
The weeping old man with the cigar in his mouth was ludicrous. The plan the writer had for the raising of his bed was forgotten and later the carpenter did it in his own way and the writer, who was past sixty, had to help himself with a chair when he went to bed at night.
The looks of surprise which my actions elicited from the Martians were ludicrous; they could not understand, except in a feeble and childish way, such attributes as gratitude and compassion.
When he beheld nothing but stockades and bastions, calculated for defense against naked savages, he felt an emotion of indignant surprise, mingled with something of the ludicrous. "Is this the fort," cried he, "about which I have heard so much talking?
When he told me this he put his hand to his cheek as though he still felt the smart of the blow, and in his eyes was a pain that was heartrending and an amazement that was ludicrous. He looked like an overblown schoolboy, and though I felt so sorry for him, I could hardly help laughing.
"What!" said he, "have not the most ludicrous things always happened to us old anchorites and saints?