luftmensch

luftmensch

(ˈlʊftˌmɛnʃ)
n, pl -menschen (-mɛnʃən)
a person unconcerned with the practicalities of earning a living
References in periodicals archive ?
The texts of his education, it seems, have produced a luftmensch.
Norman is a warm-hearted nudnik (pest), who is also a hondler (hustler), a luftmensch (dreamer), and, ultimately, a lamed-vovnik (secret saint).
Theodore Weissberg, luftmensch and virtuoso violinist, and Simon Zinner, flutist, are plucked from the wings of the stage of the Dresden Philharmonic on Kristallnacht by the Gestapo and sent to Dachau.
(24) See Anderson's discussion of the relation between the anti-Semitic term "Luftmensch" and "Lufthunde" (1992, 90ff).
The following brief analysis represents the preliminary foreground of a new study of the Jewish immigrant experience that I have undertaken, to be called, "The Luftmensch and the Laborer: Work, Class and Social Capital in the Americanization of Jewish Immigrants (1881-1929)."
He is an amalgam of every Jewish and antisemitic pejorative; luftmensch, unkempt, unassimilated and unwanted by "proper" Jews (read: wannabe Germans) and Germans alike.
Szara, for all his disillusionment, remains a citizen "of a mythical country, a place not here and not there, where national borders expanded and contracted." He is a Luftmensch, a lost soul as adrift as Le Carre's similarly abandoned George Smiley:
Augie is something of a Luftmensch--but an urban Luftmensch, an American Luftmensch, receptive not only to experience but to what gives all experience meaning, the power of language.
Eschewing convention, he does not criticize directly a single mother who wants to spend time with her children; instead, he mocks the Luftmensch, a fellow something like Bernard Shaw's Cusins, in Harvard Square or the Pedestrian Mall of Iowa City, with little gainful employment, who wrestles with Lacan and Leviticus while his wife and children are scrapping at home.
the Eastern Jew and the Luftmensch." As noted, Gelernter's public stance is as an observant Jew.
David Gordon, sometime girlie-magazine editor, cab-driver, bartender, highfalutin poet, would-be right-wing intellectual, living off his wife's salary throughout his married life, seems to have had the slippery vitality and the rotten luck of the typical Luftmensch, a stock figure in Yiddish lore - full of hopeful schemes, never far from ruin and disgrace.