lugubriously


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Related to lugubriously: rueful, complacently

lu·gu·bri·ous

 (lo͝o-go͞o′brē-əs, -gyo͞o′-)
adj.
Mournful, dismal, or gloomy, especially to an exaggerated or ludicrous degree.

[From Latin lūgubris, from lūgēre, to mourn.]

lu·gu′bri·ous·ly adv.
lu·gu′bri·ous·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.lugubriously - in a sorrowful lugubrious manner; "his long face lugubriously reflecting a hidden and unexpressed compassion"
Translations

lugubriously

[luːˈguːbrɪəslɪ] ADVlúgubremente

lugubriously

[lˈguːbriəsli] advlugubrement

lugubriously

lugubriously

[lʊˈguːbrɪəslɪ] adv (liter) → lugubremente
References in classic literature ?
The old gentlewoman took a dreary and proud satisfaction in leading Phoebe from room to room of the house, and recounting the traditions with which, as we may say, the walls were lugubriously frescoed.
There was something lugubriously comical in the way Newman's thoroughly contemporaneous optimism was confronted with this dusky old-world expedient.
I shall laugh--I know I shall; I shall die of laughing," she said, lugubriously.
Even if she started the very moment that she got it, he reflected, she would not be home till Tuesday night, and he counted lugubriously the number of hours that he would have to spend in a position of detestable authority alone with his daughter.
His mirth was hoarse and ghastly, like a raven's croak, and the sick wolf joined him, howling lugubriously.
Oh, no-o-o, oh, no-o-o," wailed Sara Ray lugubriously.
Diana howled lugubriously on seeing the remains of Satellite, which seemed as motionless as if they reposed on solid earth.
sighed an ample lady, lugubriously shaking her head; "they shut up their wives because it suits them, and don't care what their sufferings are.
Then he fell, and lay where he fell, howling lugubriously as the long train of sleds churned by.
The Head, Mr Kirsopp (none of the Turn to Page 42 kids knew his first name, of course), "emerged lugubriously at the end of lunchtime," recalled Hilton.
And all the while Richard Nichols' Baron Hardupp huffs and puffs and bumbles lugubriously, dreading the visit from social services that thankfully never comes.
Oleaginous, lugubriously lipped recruiters, who would make even a snake-oil salesman blush, accused of charging sponsors a huge fee and then leaving the recruits to languish under the burden of reimbursing their huge "fees" to pay for their visas or return of passport, maids sometimes being assigned to Dickensian-style workhouse conditions and if in desperation, they run away, they enter the netherworld of being trapped in Bahrain.