lugworm

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lug·worm

 (lŭg′wûrm′)
n.
Any of various burrowing marine annelid worms of the genus Arenicola, especially A. marina, often used as fishing bait. Also called lobworm.

[Origin unknown.]

lugworm

(ˈlʌɡˌwɜːm)
n
(Animals) any polychaete worm of the genus Arenicola, living in burrows on sandy shores and having tufted gills: much used as bait by fishermen. Sometimes shortened to: lug Also called: lobworm
[C17: of uncertain origin]

lug•worm

(ˈlʌgˌwɜrm)

n.
any burrowing annelid worm of the genus Arenicola, of ocean shores, having tufted gills.
[1795–1805]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lugworm - marine worms having a row of tufted gills along each side of the backlugworm - marine worms having a row of tufted gills along each side of the back; often used for fishing bait
class Polychaeta, Polychaeta - marine annelid worms
polychaete, polychaete worm, polychete, polychete worm - chiefly marine annelids possessing both sexes and having paired appendages (parapodia) bearing bristles
Translations

lugworm

[ˈlʌgˌwɜːm] Nlombriz f de tierra

lugworm

nKöderwurm m

lugworm

[ˈlʌgˌwɜːm] narenicola
References in periodicals archive ?
answers Dachshund The 10 Sleuth, 9 Queensland, 8 Gallery, Hatton The 7 II, Harold 6 Swimming, questions: 10 5 Diamond, Neil 4 Suffolk, 3 Lugworms, 2 Satsuma, 1.
But the species' mating opportunities are limited as lugworms spend most of their lives burrowed deep in the sediment.
Browne ran laboratory experiments with colleagues in the United Kingdom in which they exposed lugworms (Arenicola marina) to sand with 5 percent microplastic (polyvinylchloride) that also contained common chemical pollutants (nonylphenol, phenanthrene) and additives (triclosan, PBDE-47).
We were also out at midnight to dig lugworms on the big tides, to give us the best possible bait.
Ragworms, lugworms and other species buried in the soft sediments provide food for thousands of over-wintering and migratory birds, and the estuary is also important for migratory fish, including shad and lampreys, and as a nursery for many species of young fish.
They found that microscopic fragments of plastic had been ingested by barnacles--which filter water for food--as well as by lugworms, crustaceans and plankton.
So if you see a grey-haired man on the banks of the Mersey in the next few weeks, don't worry, he's not about to throw himself in, he's just scouring the mud for lugworms.
I've been doing the Ten To Follow for two or three years and this is the best I've done," said Gosling, a bait digger who supplies lugworms for fishermen.