lumbar

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lumbar

relating to the loin, especially the lower back area: a pain in the lumbar region
Not to be confused with:
lumber – logs or timber cut for use; to move in a slow, clumsy, noisy way: He lumbers along like an old, angry bear.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

lum·bar

 (lŭm′bər, -bär′)
adj.
Of, near, or situated in the part of the back and sides between the lowest ribs and the pelvis.
n.
A lumbar artery, nerve, vertebra, or part.

[New Latin lumbāris, from Latin lumbus, loin.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lumbar

(ˈlʌmbə)
adj
(Anatomy) of, near, or relating to the part of the body between the lowest ribs and the hipbones
[C17: from New Latin lumbāris, from Latin lumbus loin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lum•bar

(ˈlʌm bər, -bɑr)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to the loin or loins.
n.
2. a lumbar vertebra, artery, or the like.
[1650–60; < New Latin lumbāris= Latin lumb(us) loin + -āris -ar1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

lum·bar

(lŭm′bər)
Located at or near the part of the back lying between the lowest ribs and the hips: lumbar vertebrae; the lumbar spine.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.lumbar - of or relating to or near the part of the back between the ribs and the hipbones; "lumbar vertebrae"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
bederní

lumbar

[ˈlʌmbəʳ] ADJlumbar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

lumbar

adjLenden-, lumbal (spec); the lumbar regiondie Lendengegend; lumbar punctureLumbalpunktion f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

lumbar

[ˈlʌmbəʳ] adj (Med) → lombare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

lum·bar

a. lumbar, región de la espalda entre el tórax y la pelvis;
___ puncturepunción ___;
___ vertebraevértebras ___ -es.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lumbar

adj lumbar
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(A) A pie chart shows the precise Conus Medullaris position in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. The CM located at the level of first lumber vertebra (L1) in 51% of the patients.
When comparing the complication profiles of open versus endoscopic treatment of lumbar disc herniation and lumbar spinal stenosis, endoscopic techniques have been shown to have a more favorable risk profile with equivalent to superior clinical outcomes.
Conclusion: Lumbar spinous process-splitting laminectomy led to significant improvement with respect to patient-reported perceived recovery, functional disability and radiological evidence of effective surgical decompression in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis.
Many short-term follow-up studies have shown positive outcomes for lumbar spinal stenosis with or without spondylolisthesis;[6],[7] however, long-term studies are limited.[8] Moreover, some recently published studies have reported contradictory results, indicating that Dynesys may not provide a significant advantage for outcomes.[9],[10] This retrospective study presented a 6.6-year follow-up (range, 72-96 months) study of lumbar spinal stenosis treated with decompression and Dynesys stabilization.
Background: Although the efficiency of conservative management for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) has been examined, different conservative management approaches have not been compared.
Comparison of surgical procedures for degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: a meta-analysis of the literature from 1975 to (1995.) Eur Spine J 1997; 6(6):423-9.
The inclusion criterion was chronic low back pain with or without leg pain due to lumbar disc herniation and/or lumbar spinal stenosis. All patients reported a history of discogenic or radicular symptoms refractory to conservative treatments for a minimum of 6 weeks.
In recent years, MRI has become the "gold standard" in the diagnosis of lumbar spinal stenosis because of its potential in visualizing radiolucent soft tissues and the absence of radiation exposure.
The classic clinical feature of lumbar spinal stenosis is neurogenic claudication which causes intermittent lower extremity pain and diminished functional abilities [1].
Some medical conditions that can cause sciatica include herniated discs, lumbar spinal stenosis, degenerative disc disease, piriformis syndrome (when the piriformis muscle presses on the sciatic nerve), spondylolisthesis (a condition in which a vertebra slips out of place), and diabetes.
The inclusion criteria for our study consisted of: (1) patients between the ages of 21 and 75 years, (2) diagnosed with degenerative disk disease, lumbar spinal stenosis, recurrent disk herniation, scoliosis, or spondylolisthesis, (3) who exclusively underwent a TLIF using ICBG or rhBMP-2, and (4) had never undergone any previous attempt of lumbar fusion.
Lumbar spinal stenosis can be the result of aging and "wear and tear" on the spine from everyday activities.