luminous energy


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luminous energy

n.
The radiant energy of electromagnetic waves in the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

luminous energy

n
(Units) energy emitted or propagated in the form of light; the product of a luminous flux and its duration, measured in lumen seconds. Symbol: Qv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.luminous energy - the energy associated with visible lightluminous energy - the energy associated with visible light
radiant energy - energy that is transmitted in the form of (electromagnetic) radiation; energy that exists in the absence of matter
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Luminous Energy, an independent developer specialising in the planning and development of solar farms, is managing the development of the project.
"The way we work with the energetics has to do with clearing the imprints of disease from the luminous energy field (LEF).
A Light-emitting diode B Liquid-emitting display C Light-enhancing data D Luminous energy dot QUESTION 5 - for 5 points: What was a printer's devil?
CCA WATTIS INSTITUTE FOR CONTEMPORARY ARTS * September 10-November 21 * Curated by Anthony Huberman * For his new project at CCA Wattis, Sam Lewitt will attach ten heaters designed for use in mobile-communication systems to the gallery's track lighting, parasitically siphoning electricity to generate thermal rather than luminous energy. As in his previous work repurposing high-tech materials (his contribution to the 2012 Whitney Biennial employed ferromagnetic liquid, used in everything from hard drives to military aircraft), Lewitt here wittily underscores the degree to which physical environments--and, by extension, contemporary neoliberal cultural and economic systems--are simultaneously strictly regulated yet highly flexible.