luna moth

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lu·na moth

 (lo͞o′nə)
n.
A large pale-green North American saturniid moth (Actias luna) with hind wings that have elongated tips.

[New Latin lūna, species name, from Latin, moon; see lunar.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

luna moth

n
(Animals) a large American saturniid moth, Tropaea (or Actias) luna, having light green wings with a yellow crescent-shaped marking on each forewing
[C19: so named from the markings on its wings]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lu′na moth`


n.
a pale green saturniid moth, Actias luna, with crescent spots and long tails on the hind wings.
[1850–55, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.luna moth - large pale-green American moth with long-tailed hind wings and a yellow crescent-shaped mark on each forewingluna moth - large pale-green American moth with long-tailed hind wings and a yellow crescent-shaped mark on each forewing
saturniid, saturniid moth - large brightly colored and usually tropical moth; larvae spin silken cocoons
Actias, genus Actias - luna moths
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hexagenias, the largest of our mayflies, are huge and clumsy - almost like Luna moths - commanding the attention of every trout in the river when they emerge.
A minimalist phase would account for redwing blackbirds, luna moths and striped skunks.
Scientists aren't sure why we luna moths eat these poisonous leaves, and beats me if I know!
Dozens of elegant luna moths, which disappeared from New York City a half century ago, were released in Central Park as part of a programme to bring wildlife back to the city.