lustihood

lustihood

(ˈlʌstɪˌhʊd)
n
lustiness
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Nationalizing philosophy as French, and constructing the French in terms of an excessive and deviant sexuality, anti-Jacobin discourse yoked the Revolution with sex in such a resonant way that, by 1798, Mathias could easily deploy, in metaphoric terms, the threat of the "lawless lustihood" of French radicals who, in their "orgies of blood and lust," "neigh after the constitutions of their neighbours" and "deflower the purity of the struggling or half-consenting victims" (15).
[12] His introduction celebrates the untaught power of nature's "wild brier" for an obviously cultivated audience and rejoices that the "triumph of art" has not "deadened the 'lustihood of nature"' (pp.
Long love requires intensity, alertness, and discipline: "a peculiar sensibility and tenderness of nature; a constitutional communicativeness and utterancy of heart and soul; a delight in the detail of sympathy, in the outward and visible signs of the sacrament within--to count, as it were, the pulses of the life of love." But more than these qualities of the senses, of language, of keen watchfulness, and of the capacity for delight, love "supposes a soul," an enduring force that outrides "the summer-tide of life," "the lustihood of health and strength." These qualities are rare to begin with, and beyond that must be carefully cultivated, explaining why in a world full of greed and self-promotion few men or women experience true and enduring love and most must find other consolations.
meaning Tom Vickers, and beautiful lustihood that is unconscious like a blossom" (p.