lutetium


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lu·te·ti·um

also lu·te·ci·um  (lo͞o-tē′shē-əm)
n. Symbol Lu
A silvery-white element of the lanthanide series that is exceptionally difficult to separate from the other rare-earth elements with which it is found, used in nuclear technology. Atomic number 71; atomic weight 174.97; melting point 1,663°C; boiling point 3,402°C; specific gravity 9.841 (at 25°C); valence 3. See Periodic Table.

[Latin Lutetia, ancient name of Paris, France (where it was discovered) + -ium.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lutetium

(lʊˈtiːʃɪəm) or

lutecium

n
(Elements & Compounds) a silvery-white metallic element of the lanthanide series, occurring in monazite and used as a catalyst in cracking, alkylation, and polymerization. Symbol: Lu; atomic no: 71; atomic wt: 174.967; valency: 3; relative density: 9.841; melting pt: 1663°C; boiling pt: 3402°C
[C19: New Latin, from Latin Lūtētia ancient name of Paris, home of G. Urbain (1872–1938), French chemist, who discovered it]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lu•te•ti•um

(luˈti ʃi əm)

n.
a trivalent rare-earth element. Symbol: Lu; at. wt.: 174.97; at. no.: 71.
[< French lutécium=Lutèce lutetia + -ium2]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

lu·te·ti·um

(lo͞o-tē′shē-əm)
Symbol Lu A silvery-white metallic element of the lanthanide series that is used in nuclear technology. Its radioactive isotope is used to find the age of meteorites. Atomic number 71. See Periodic Table.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lutetium - a trivalent metallic element of the rare earth grouplutetium - a trivalent metallic element of the rare earth group; usually occurs in association with yttrium
metal, metallic element - any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc.
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
lutetium
لوتيتيوم
лютеций
lutecium
lutetium
LutetiumCassiopeium
lutecio
luteetsium
lutetium
lutécium
lutecij
lutécium
ルテチウム
lutetium
lutetium
lutetium
lutet
lutécio
luteţiu
lutecium
lutecij
lütesyum
Luteti

lutetium

[lʊˈtiːʃɪəm] Nlutecio m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

lutetium

n (Chem) → Lutetium nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
To put this into perspective, lutetium and thulium are the two least-abundant rare earths.
Following salts of lanthanides were used as standards: Samarium (III) chloride hexahydrate, Lanthanum (III) nitrate hexahydrate, Europium (III) nitrate hexahydrate, Terbium (III) nitrate hexahydrate, Holmium(III) nitrate hydrate, Thulium (III) nitrate hexahydrate, Lutetium (III) nitrate hexahydrate, Erbium (III) nitrate hexahydrate, Samarium (III) nitrate hexahydrate, Neodymium (III) nitrate hexahydrate, Gadolinium (III) nitrate hexahydrate, Dysprosium (III) nitrate pentahydrate, Ytterbium (III) nitrate pentahydrate, and Cerium (III) nitrate hexahydrate.
The company's SuperLig[R]-One pilot recovery facility was then used to process the pregnant leach solution in the following stages: 1) rare earth separation, in which all rare earths, as a group, are isolated from the waste materials in the pregnant leach solution, 2) removal of scandium, a valuable rare earth element used in advanced aluminum alloys for the aerospace sector, 3) class separation of the light rare earth elements (lanthanum to neodymium plus yttrium) and the heavy rare earth elements (samarium to lutetium), and 4) separation of individual rare earth elements, including the pilot program separation of terbium and europium at over 99% purity, plus dysprosium at 99.99% purity.
Back in the university lab, Knott researched complexes made from the rare earth metals scandium, yttrium and lutetium. Such complexes can often catalyze the reactions that turn lactic acid--a renewable chemical produced from sugar by bacteria --into polylactic acid (PLA), one of the most common types of biodegradeable polymers.
By using appropriate vectors and linkers with hard beta-emitting yttrium or lutetium, it enables identification of the tumor and, what is more important, destruction of cells with somatostatin receptors [7].
In this case, the union would decide whether lawrencium (along with its relative, lutetium) belongs at the bottom of the periodic table's third column or at the end of a separate row of elements in an annex below the main table.
Rare earths are 17 chemical elements in the periodic table, specifically 15 lanthanides: lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium, lutetium, as well as scandium and yttrium.
So, the only electron in hydrogen is located at the K level, starting with lithium, L-level appears, in potassium level M starts to be filled, N-level is fully filled in lutetium, and O- and P-levels are not completely filled in either elements of the Mendeleev periodic system [10, 11].
showcased its PET-CT system, which features a lutetium oxyorthosilicate detector for the PET unit and a 16-multislice CT scanner.
rare earth metals--set of 17 elements on the periodic table, from lanthanum to lutetium, plus scandium and yttrium
Twenty-first-century innovations have expanded the list of medical materials well beyond the traditional metals and polymers to include diamond (retinal implants), lutetium oxyorthosilicate (X-ray imaging), gold (diagnostics), shrimp shells/silk (sutures, biological scaffolds) and glass (bone repair).