lutite


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lutite

(ˈluːtaɪt)
n
(Minerals) another name for pelite
[C20: from Latin lutum mud + -ite1]
References in periodicals archive ?
Non-stable fragments are represented by subangular K-feldspar grains (orthoclase and microcline) with [M.sub.d] 0.20 mm, polysynthetically twinned plagioclase, flakes of muscovite and biotite and subangular to subrounded clasts of lutite. Both feldspars are at different stages kaolinised and sericitised.
The Mesozoic-Tertiary cover bed presents greater lithological diversity, although the areas closest to the axis have a predominance of limestone, dolomite, marl, marly limestone, sandstone, clay--with and without evaporites--, lutite, conglomerate and turbidite (Fig.
In the Central Baltoscandian Confacies Belt this event coincides with coarsening of the calcareous sediment from lutite to fine-grained shelly sand (Jaanusson 1982b, pp.
The soils of the region are basically a rocky substrate of Upper Cretaceous lutite or siltstone.
The second group is comprised of outcrops of sandstone, limestone, and argillite (lutite).
Especially, phyllosilicates with properties of clay minerals in the sediment-forming processes and in the argillosphere affected by post-depositional processes are a great theme, which attracts attention of geologists and other experts examining argillaceous and lutite accumulations developed through the geological history of the Earth.
In dark lutite layers locally associated with this facies, total organic carbon contents (T.O.C.) have been determined.
4), which comprises a 106 m thick basal lutite sequence dominated by red and green lutites, with some sandstone alternations deposited by fluvio-alluvial processes.