luxuriancy

luxuriancy

(lʌɡˈzjʊərɪənsɪ)
n
another word for luxuriance
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
In The Arrangement and General Survey of Knowledge (De Augmentis Scientiarum, 1623), Bacon considers an overemphasis on the study of words as a "Distemper of Learning" and proposes the idea that "Words are but the Images of Matter" (Philosophical Works 25), which are significant because ordinary people can understand them, not only certain admirers of the "Luxuriancy of Style" (Philosophical Works 24).
Declaring that "the temper of a woman is generally formed from the turn of her features," the Vicar refers the difference between Sophia's sense and Olivia's sensibility to their physiognomies, calling Sophia's beauty "not so striking" as Olivia's "luxuriancy" (21).
He took special interest in `the firmness, the symmetry and the luxuriancy of her bosom'.
Yet, given the uncertainty of salvation, he argues that we are also justified in bearing ourselves with gravity, seriousness, and sobriety; if not for this uncertainty, "why should not a Man give himself up to the utmost Gaity and Jollity, and express it in all manner of odd Postures and Gestures up to the height of an Antick Dissoluteness?" "Why not Shandy it," we might paraphrase Norris's rhetorical question, for which he provides an immediate answer: because we are going to die and be judged, a man must "temper and correct the Luxuriancy of his Spirit, with some Grains of Sadness and Pensiveness, and beware of laughing too much here, lest it should be his Turn to weep and mourn hereafter" (51).