lymphadenopathy


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lym·phad·e·nop·a·thy

 (lĭm-făd′n-ŏp′ə-thē, lĭm′fə-dn-)
n. pl. lym·phad·e·nop·a·thies
An enlargement of the lymph nodes, usually associated with disease.

lymphadenopathy

(lɪmˌfædɪˈnɒpəθɪ; ˌlɪmfæd-)
n
(Pathology) a swelling of the lymph nodes, usually caused by inflammation associated with a viral infection such as rubella

lym•phad•e•nop•a•thy

(lɪmˌfæd nˈɒp ə θi)

n.
chronically swollen lymph nodes.
[1915–20; lymph- + adeno- + -pathy]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lymphadenopathy - chronic abnormal enlargement of the lymph nodes (usually associated with disease)
pathology - any deviation from a healthy or normal condition
Translations

lym·phad·e·nop·a·thy

n. linfadenopatía, enfermedad que afecta los nódulos linfáticos;
axillary ______ axilar;
cervical ______ cervical;
generalized ______ generalizada;
mediastinal ______ mediastínica;
supraclavicular ______ supraclavicular.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD), also known as sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy, is a rare, benign, non-Langerhanscell, histiocytic proliferative disease without any known cause.1 Histopathological hallmark of Rosai-Dorfman disease is characteristic histiocytes with abundant pale cytoplasm exhibiting emperipolesis.
Physical examination revealed fever of 39AdegC, she had tender, mobile bilateral cervical lymphadenopathy. Moreover she also had positive fluid thrill and mild pedal edema.
There was no significant cervical, axillary, or inguinal lymphadenopathy, and no facial nerve dysfunction.
Lymphadenopathy is one of the most common and at times the first clinical sign of any disease in the body be it infective, benign or malignant.
The medical records of 56 children with lymphadenopathy between 2014 and 2017 were reviewed retrospectively at Ege University, Children's Hospital, General Pediatrics Unit.
All dogs showed lymphadenopathy. FNAC samples of draining lymph nodes (Table 1) were collected from dogs attended.
During April 2009-May 2014, eighty immunocompetent patients (73 children, 7 adults) in Japan who were suspected of having CSD because of fever with or without lymphadenopathy, and a history of contact with cats or dogs were referred to us for serologic and molecular diagnosis of CSD.
All five were found to have mediastinal lymphadenopathy on surveillance CT scans as part of regular follow-up.
The patient's most recent staging imaging after completion of chemotherapy revealed excellent response with resolution of retroperitoneal and pelvic lymphadenopathy with decreased enhancement of multiple bone lesions (Figures 2(c) and 2(d)).
DAY 2 (i) Develops swelling of both hands and feet, with tender right-sided posterior lymphadenopathy. (ii) Fever persists.