pumping

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pump1
top: jet pump
bottom: centrifugal pump

pump 1

 (pŭmp)
n.
1. A machine or device for raising, compressing, or transferring fluids.
2. Physiology A molecular mechanism for the active transport of ions or molecules across a cell membrane.
3. Physics Electromagnetic radiation used to raise atoms or molecules to a higher energy level.
4. Informal The heart.
5. Informal The place where consumers purchase gasoline. Used with the: gas prices rising at the pump.
v. pumped, pump·ing, pumps
v.tr.
1. To cause to flow by means of a pump or pumplike organ or device: Derricks pumped oil out of the ground. The heart pumps blood throughout the body.
2. To draw, deliver, or pour forth: a writer who pumped out a new novel every year.
3. To propel, eject, or insert: pumped new life into the economy.
4. To cause to move with an up-and-down or back-and-forth motion: a bicyclist pumping the pedals; a piston pumping a shaft.
5. To push or pull (a brake or lever, for instance) rapidly: a driver pumping the brakes.
6. To shoot (bullets, for example) at or into: a gunner pumping rounds at a target.
7. Physics To raise (atoms or molecules) to a higher energy level by exposing them to electromagnetic radiation at a resonant frequency.
8. Physiology To transport (ions or molecules) against a concentration gradient by the expenditure of chemically stored energy.
9. To invest (money) repeatedly or persistently in something.
10. To question closely or persistently: pump a witness for secret information.
11. Informal To promote or publicize vigorously: The company pumped its new product on its website.
v.intr.
1. To operate a pump.
2. To move gas or liquid with a pump or a pumplike organ or device.
3. To move up and down or back and forth in a vigorous manner: My legs were pumping as I ran up the stairs.
4. To flow in spurts: Blood was pumping from the wound.
5. Sports To fake a throw, pass, or shot by moving the arm or arms without releasing the ball.
Phrasal Verb:
pump up
1. To inflate with gas by means of a pump: pump up a tire.
2. Slang To fill with enthusiasm, strength, or energy: The lively debate really pumped us up.
3. Sports To be actively involved in a bodybuilding program: athletes pumping up at the gym.
Idiom:
pump iron Sports
To lift weights.

[Middle English pumpe.]

pump′er n.

pump 2

 (pŭmp)
n.
A shoe that has a closed back and is cut low around the toes, usually with heels and no fastenings.

[Origin unknown.]
Translations

pump·ing

n. bombeo;
heart ______ del corazón;
stomach ______ estomacal.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because the lymphatics are a closed system not driven by the heart, lymph travels by way of interstitial fluid pressure and lymphatic pumping action.