lymphocytosis


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lym·pho·cy·to·sis

 (lĭm′fō-sī-tō′sĭs)
n.
A condition marked by an abnormal increase in the number of lymphocytes in the bloodstream, usually resulting from infection or inflammation.

lym′pho·cy·tot′ic (-tŏt′ĭk) adj.

lymphocytosis

(ˌlɪmfəʊsaɪˈtəʊsɪs)
n
(Pathology) an abnormally large number of lymphocytes in the blood: often found in diseases such as glandular fever and smallpox
lymphocytotic adj

lym•pho•cy•to•sis

(ˌlɪm fə saɪˈtoʊ sɪs)

n.
an abnormal increase in the number of lymphocytes in the blood.
[1895–1900]
lym`pho•cy•tot′ic (-ˈtɒt ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lymphocytosis - an abnormal increase in the number of lymphocytes in the circulating blood
blood disease, blood disorder - a disease or disorder of the blood
Translations

lym·pho·cy·to·sis

n. linfocitosis, cantidad excesiva de linfocitos en la sangre periférica.
References in periodicals archive ?
Transient headache and neurological deficit along with the presence of lymphocytes in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is defined as CSF lymphocytosis (HaNDL sydrome).
Persistent polyclonal B cell lymphocytosis (PPBL) is a rare and presumably nonmalignant lymphoproliferative disorder diagnosed predominantly in women [1, 2], although a few men have also been diagnosed with this condition [3-5].
Using initial response to treatment as an outcome, the "immunophenotypic status" of the MCL was the only independent factor associated with response to treatment (P = .05) but not with MIPI (P = .10), absolute lymphocytosis (P = .63), or WBC counts (P = .55) (Table 3).
The haematological abnormalities that have been seen consistently associated with malaria include anaemia, thrombocytopenia and mild-to-moderate atypical lymphocytosis. Infrequently disseminated intravascular coagulation has also been reported.
In leukocytes, alterations were neutrophilia, eosinophilia, lymphocytosis, regenerative shift to left, degenerative shift to left, toxic granules in neutrophils, shift to right, lymphopenia and neutopenia.
We repeated GI endoscopies: upper GI endoscopy found a chronic duodenitis with villous atrophy and intraepithelial lymphocytosis and lack of plasma cells (Figure 1).
The biochemical characteristics of CSF are very similar in these two infections; however, some authors have pointed out that CSF in cryptococcal meningitis usually reveals a mild increase in lymphocytes and that finding significant lymphocytosis should raise the concern for a concomitant pathology [6].
However, monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) in patients with autoimmune diseases has rarely been reported.
Confirmed case: (a) by laboratorial criteria: isolation of Bordetella pertussis; (b) by epidemiological criteria: any suspected case which has had contact with a pertussis confirmed case by laboratory testing, between the beginning of the catarrhal period up to three weeks after onset of the disease paroxysmal period; (c) by clinical criteria: every suspected case of pertussis whose hemogram shows leukocytosis (over 20,000 leukocytes/m[m.sup.3]) and absolute lymphocytosis (over 10,000 leukocytes/m[m.sup.3]) and negative or not performed culture; and absence of epidemiological linkage; and no confirmation of another etiology.
The CBC results revealed a marked leukocytosis (337 x [10.sup.3] cells/[micro]L; reference interval for mynahs (Gracula religiosa): 6-11 x [10.sup.3] cells/[micro]L) characterized by a marked lymphocytosis (315 x [10.sup.3] cells/[micro]L) and a mild heterophilia (22 x [10.sup.3]/[micro]L).