lymphoid

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Related to lymphoid cells: lymphoid tissue, lymphoma, Lymphocytes, Myeloid cells

lym·phoid

 (lĭm′foid′)
adj.
1. Of or relating to lymph or the lymphatic tissue where lymphocytes are formed.
2. Of or relating to lymphocytic cells, including B cells, T cells, and their precursors, that are thought to derive from a common progenitor in the bone marrow.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lymphoid

(ˈlɪmfɔɪd)
adj
1. (Biochemistry) of or resembling lymph, or relating to the lymphatic system
2. (Anatomy) of or resembling lymph, or relating to the lymphatic system
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lym•phoid

(ˈlɪm fɔɪd)

adj.
1. of, pertaining to, or resembling lymph.
2. of or pertaining to the tissue (lym′phoid tis`sue) that occurs in the lymph nodes, thymus, tonsils, and spleen and produces lymphocytes.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.lymphoid - resembling lymph or lymphatic tissues
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

lym·phoid

a. linfoide, que se asemeja al tejido linfático.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lymphoid

adj linfoide
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Now the researchers have found that their vaccination strategy marshals a platoon of immune cells, called innate lymphoid cells (ILC1) and monocytes, in the genital tissues to work together and release chemicals (chemokines) to send out a call to the CD8 T-cells generated by the vaccine to troop into the genital tissue.
Biopsy of the mass revealed lymphoid tissue completely effaced by medium-sized lymphoid cells and irregular nuclear membrane.
B, Lymphoid cells display a centrocytic appearance with cleaved nuclei.
On immunohistochemical analysis, the cytoplasm of 80% of the reticular cells showed abundant detectable brown antigen binding with pancytokeratin staining, and most lymphoid cells showed detectable antigen in the cytoplasm by using CD3 antibodies.
FNA of the bone marrow showed 50% of atypical small to medium sized lymphoid cells with irregularly shaped nuclei and a moderate amount of cytoplasm containing large granules (Fig.
LyP is part of a spectrum of CD30 (Ki-1)-positive cutaneous lymphoproliferative diseases (CD30+ LPDs), including lymphomatoid papulosis, primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma (pcALCL), and borderline CD30+ lesions.5 The pathophysiology of CD30+ LPDs, including LyP, is largely unknown.6 CD30 signaling is known to have an effect on the growth and survival of lymphoid cells, and one hypothesis is that genetic instability and accumulated genetic defects may have a role in the development of LyP and the progression to associated neoplasms.7
These cells, as well as other myeloid and lymphoid cells, comprise the human immune system, and ITUS's Cchek monitors perturbations in the immune system to identify tumors.
When the smears showed increased cellularity with cells foreign to the lymph nodes with normal or reactive lymphoid cells in the background, a diagnosis of metastatic lymph node [5] was given.
Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare nonHodgkin T-cell lymphoma characterized by large lymphoid cells with abundant cytoplasm, pleomorphic, horseshoeshaped nuclei, and uniform CD30/Ki-1 expression [1, 4, 5].
Histologic sections of the lesions showed disseminated neoplastic lymphoid cells in the lumen of small and intermediate vessels in the organs including the aorta (Figure 1(c)), right atrium (Figure 1(d)), brain (Figure 2(a)), bladder (Figure 2(b)), thyroid (Figure 2(c)), right and left kidneys, retroperitoneal lymph nodes, right liver lobe, stomach, right and left lungs, right and left adrenal glands, and small intestine.
The lymphoepithelioma-like hepatocellular carcinoma (or inflammatory carcinoma) is a rare primary neoplasm of the liver, usually poorly differentiated, in which the neoplastic component is densely infiltrated by lymphoid cells.