lynch law


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lynch law

n.
The practice of lynching: "the injustices suffered by black citizens—disfranchisement, lynch law and mob rule" (Scot French).

[Probably after Charles Lynch (1736-1796), American militiaman and justice of the peace who held summary extralegal trials and whippings of supposed Tory sympathizers in Virginia during the American Revolution.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lynch law

n
(Law) the practice of condemning and punishing a person by mob action without a proper trial
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lynch′ law`


n.
the administration of summary punishment, esp. death, upon a presumed offender by a mob.
[1805–15, after the self-instituted tribunals presided over by William Lynch (1742–1820) of Pittsylvania, Va., c1776]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lynch law - the practice of punishing people by hanging without due process of law
practice, pattern - a customary way of operation or behavior; "it is their practice to give annual raises"; "they changed their dietary pattern"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

lynch law

nLynchjustiz f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Had he exerted a little of the Lynch law of the wilderness, and hanged those dexterous horsemen in their own lasos, it would but have been a well-merited and salutary act of retributive justice.
I succeeded in getting away without an additional blow, and barely so; for to strike a white man is death by Lynch law,--and that was the law in Mr.
The head of Yakutia Aisen Nikolayev called on avoid lynch law and said that perpetrators will be held liable.
But between June 1945 and September 1946, 56 black people were murdered in an outbreak of lynch law violations as the law was deployed to restore prewar social order.
has behaved like a "police state, threatening and torturing a suspect to get evidence." He added that the new sanctions amount to "inflicting a punishment in the absence of a crime in the tradition of lynch law."
Part Three explains how lynch law resulted in a system of state-sanctioned justice.
(I suspect, however, that his coverage of such items as burial sites allows him to evade larger issues.) He tells us that Governor Lynch was the grandson of Judge Charles Lynch, the Revolutionary War's "hanging judge" in old Virginia; the judge's legacy survives in the terms "lynching" and "lynch law" (44).
Wells's antilyn-ching treatises, Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All its Phases (1892) and A Red Record, 1892-1894 (1895).
Sounds to me like a new form of lynch law. In that fabulous protest song Strange Fruit, Billie Holiday sang of "black bodies swingin' in the Southern breeze, strange fruit hangin' from the poplar trees...
Davis was just warming up: "Any state in which Negroes are burned at the stake, every state where lynch law and mob rule prevails, and every city where officers club Negroes openly into insensibility, are under Democratic rule.''
Finally, he demonstrates the viability of his revisionist interpretation of lynching in an extended and nuanced treatment of the problem in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Georgia, the state with the highest incidence of lynch law.
He wrote of a tormentor: "One venerable old lady, whom I had known all my life, wrote me that although she had never believed in lynch law, she would do nothing to prevent a mob from dragging my 'big overgroan karkus' across the public square."