lynch

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lynch

 (lĭnch)
tr.v. lynched, lynch·ing, lynch·es
To punish (a person) without legal process or authority, especially by hanging, for a perceived offense or as an act of bigotry.

[From lynch law.]

lynch′er n.
lynch′ing n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lynch

(lɪntʃ)
vb
(Law) (tr) (of a mob) to punish (a person) for some supposed offence by hanging without a trial
[probably after Charles Lynch (1736–96), Virginia justice of the peace, who presided over extralegal trials of Tories during the American War of Independence]
ˈlyncher n
ˈlynching n

Lynch

(lɪntʃ)
n
1. (Biography) David. born 1946, US film director; his work includes the films Eraserhead (1977), Blue Velvet (1986), Wild at Heart (1990), Mulholland Drive (2001), and Inland Empire (2006), and the television series Twin Peaks (1990)
2. (Biography) John, known as Jack Lynch. 1917–99, Irish statesman; prime minister of the Republic of Ireland (1966–73; 1977–79)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lynch

(lɪntʃ)

v.t.
to put to death, esp. by hanging, by mob action.
[1825–35, Amer.; v. use of lynch in lynch law]
lynch′er, n.

Lynch

(lɪntʃ)

n.
John (Jack), 1917–99, prime minister of Ireland 1966–73, 1977–79.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

lynch


Past participle: lynched
Gerund: lynching

Imperative
lynch
lynch
Present
I lynch
you lynch
he/she/it lynches
we lynch
you lynch
they lynch
Preterite
I lynched
you lynched
he/she/it lynched
we lynched
you lynched
they lynched
Present Continuous
I am lynching
you are lynching
he/she/it is lynching
we are lynching
you are lynching
they are lynching
Present Perfect
I have lynched
you have lynched
he/she/it has lynched
we have lynched
you have lynched
they have lynched
Past Continuous
I was lynching
you were lynching
he/she/it was lynching
we were lynching
you were lynching
they were lynching
Past Perfect
I had lynched
you had lynched
he/she/it had lynched
we had lynched
you had lynched
they had lynched
Future
I will lynch
you will lynch
he/she/it will lynch
we will lynch
you will lynch
they will lynch
Future Perfect
I will have lynched
you will have lynched
he/she/it will have lynched
we will have lynched
you will have lynched
they will have lynched
Future Continuous
I will be lynching
you will be lynching
he/she/it will be lynching
we will be lynching
you will be lynching
they will be lynching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been lynching
you have been lynching
he/she/it has been lynching
we have been lynching
you have been lynching
they have been lynching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been lynching
you will have been lynching
he/she/it will have been lynching
we will have been lynching
you will have been lynching
they will have been lynching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been lynching
you had been lynching
he/she/it had been lynching
we had been lynching
you had been lynching
they had been lynching
Conditional
I would lynch
you would lynch
he/she/it would lynch
we would lynch
you would lynch
they would lynch
Past Conditional
I would have lynched
you would have lynched
he/she/it would have lynched
we would have lynched
you would have lynched
they would have lynched
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.lynch - kill without legal sanction; "The blood-thirsty mob lynched the alleged killer of the child"
kill - cause to die; put to death, usually intentionally or knowingly; "This man killed several people when he tried to rob a bank"; "The farmer killed a pig for the holidays"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

lynch

verb hang, kill, execute, put to death, string up (informal), send to the gallows They were about to lynch him when reinforcements arrived.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

lynch

[lɪntʃ]
A. VTlinchar
B. CPD lynch law Nley f del linchamiento
lynch mob N muchedumbre dispuesta a linchar a alguien
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

lynch

[ˈlɪntʃ] vtlyncherlynch mob n
(lit)lyncheurs mpl
(fig) (= critics) → lyncheurs mpl
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

lynch

vtlynchen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

lynch

[lɪntʃ] vtlinciare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Neither "crime," either the unspoken crime of the black man or the unspeakable crime of the white lynchers, is recognized by the law.
The garlanding of the Jhakhand lynchers by Jayant Sinha, a Harvard hero and a Central Minister, was one of the ways in which a "taste for savagery' is imparted to unsophisticated crowds.
The silent men, women, and children streaming down the center of Manhattan instead carried signs reading: "Mother, Do Lynchers Go to Heaven?"; "Pray for the Lady Macbeths of East St.
(6) Dora Apel, for example, who specifically examines what the act of looking at lynching photographs means, describes the relationship between the white lynchers and the black lynched as one of "power to helplessness, citizen to outsider, privilege to oppression, jubilation to degradation, subjecthood to objecthood, community to outcast, pride to humiliation" ("On Looking" 458).
It was close to the hour when on these dark roads the trio had been released from jail and into the hands of their lynchers. Turning toward an ill-lit gas station, I drove straight into a ditch.
And what is even more shocking, a person of prominence like Jayant Sinha, the minister of state for civil aviation, garlands the Jharkhand lynchers in a public function!
The book's poems and sketches record an abiding beauty that Kabnis found impossible to reconcile with the crushing ugliness--the "hog pens and chicken yards," "dirty red mud," "stinking outhouses," "lynchers and business men"--that he saw around him (85).
Even more provocative perhaps on Dunbar's part is the exposure of the lynchers as figures of authority and responsibility within the white community, as "the judge," "the doctor," and "the minister" (who, in bringing along "his oldest son," completes the image of the masked riders as the four horsemen of the apocalypse).
Wideman produced one more novel during the 1970s--The Lynchers, a bareknuckles survey of the vigilante mind--but it wasn't until the first volume of The Homewood Trilogy, in 1981, that he found some of the answers to the questions posed in the earlier books.
Earlier that afternoon, Kattell had visited his father to tell him of the jury's not-guilty verdict, whereupon his father told him about one of the other Carradine lynchers who, after the killing, started to drink, "Drink heavy, drink hard" (II-3).
White's attempts to pass a bill placing lynching under the jurisdiction of the federal court system ("Trial of Lynchers" 2).
The sexualized elements of the Abu Ghraib torture regimes, though less fatal than in lynchings, are more explicitly rendered in the photographs: while lynchers generally took care to cover the castrated genitals of their victims in photographs (the covering fetishistically evoking and denying black male potency), no such restraint is evident in the Abu Ghraib images.