lynching


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lynch

 (lĭnch)
tr.v. lynched, lynch·ing, lynch·es
To punish (a person) without legal process or authority, especially by hanging, for a perceived offense or as an act of bigotry.

[From lynch law.]

lynch′er n.
lynch′ing n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lynching - putting a person to death by mob action without due process of lawlynching - putting a person to death by mob action without due process of law
murder, slaying, execution - unlawful premeditated killing of a human being by a human being
Translations

lynching

[ˈlɪntʃɪŋ] Nlinchamiento m

lynching

nLynchen nt; there’ll be a lynching sooner etc wird bestimmt gelyncht werden

lynching

[ˈlɪntʃɪŋ] nlinciaggio
References in classic literature ?
I happened to find myself in a town in which so much excitement and indignation were being expressed that it seemed likely for a time that there would be a lynching.
Why was it, mused Mr Ferguson, that every girl in every country town in every county of England who had ever recited 'Curfew shall not ring tonight' well enough to escape lynching at the hands of a rustic audience was seized with the desire to come to London and go on the stage?
The exhibit of lynching photos, Without Sanctuary, helped renew and reinvigorate conversations about lynching in Georgia, including the lynching of Leo Frank.
DU BOIS AND MARCUS GARVEY, TWO TITANS in the fight for human rights for blacks, shared one thing for certain--the unbridled rage they felt when the topic of lynching was mentioned.
In so far as there is a connecting argument, it has to do with the local development of lynching culture as a local response to alleged social and political threat.
Johnson deserves recognition as the most prolific playwright of the lynching drama tradition and as the New Negro Renaissance artist whose work reflects an unprecedented and unrelenting devotion to the anti-lynching movement.
2) Early in the morning of 17 May 1929 he became the victim of the state's well-established tradition of extralegal violence, more commonly referred to as lynching, and his death became part of a larger story of the frequency with which Americans brutally inflicted what they called justice on the bodies of the powerless.
AT THE HANDS OF PERSONS UNKNOWN: The Lynching of Black America by Philip Dray Random House, $29.
Enterprising photographers often recorded the scenes and sold postcards with lynching photos on the back.
Wells's coverage of the lynching of her three friends in Memphis and the subsequent destruction of her newspaper office.
Plays representing the history of lynching in the United States are only beginning to be understood as a distinctly American theatrical genre, a type of drama that began to appear at least as early as 1905 and continues to evolve on the contemporary stage.
My recent discovery Georgia Douglas Johnson's "lost" lynching plays ends a scholarly quest of many years and confirms Johnson's status as the leading playwright of the genre.