lynching


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lynch

 (lĭnch)
tr.v. lynched, lynch·ing, lynch·es
To punish (a person) without legal process or authority, especially by hanging, for a perceived offense or as an act of bigotry.

[From lynch law.]

lynch′er n.
lynch′ing n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lynching - putting a person to death by mob action without due process of lawlynching - putting a person to death by mob action without due process of law
murder, slaying, execution - unlawful premeditated killing of a human being by a human being
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

lynching

[ˈlɪntʃɪŋ] Nlinchamiento m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

lynching

nLynchen nt; there’ll be a lynching sooner etc wird bestimmt gelyncht werden
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

lynching

[ˈlɪntʃɪŋ] nlinciaggio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
I happened to find myself in a town in which so much excitement and indignation were being expressed that it seemed likely for a time that there would be a lynching. The occasion of the trouble was that a dark-skinned man had stopped at the local hotel.
Why was it, mused Mr Ferguson, that every girl in every country town in every county of England who had ever recited 'Curfew shall not ring tonight' well enough to escape lynching at the hands of a rustic audience was seized with the desire to come to London and go on the stage?
Summary: Jaipur (Rajasthan) [India], Aug 5 (ANI): The Rajasthan Assembly on Monday passed an anti-lynching bill that provides for life imprisonment and heavy fines to those convicted in fatal mob lynching incidents after speedy trials.
MARDAN -- The police here on Thursday arrested one of the main suspects identified as Arif Mardanvi who was nominated in Mashal Khan lynching case.
In this study, the authors go one better: They meticulously cross-reference news articles on individual cases of lynching with detailed census information to tell readers more about who these victims were, people who too often have remained mere "figurative silhouettes" (32).
and Kathleen Rogers Chair in Church and Society, and Associate Professor of Ethics and Black Church Studies at Saint Paul School of Theology" chronicles the history and aftermath of lynching in America.
And moreover, EJI plans to build a national memorial to victims of lynching and open a museum that explores African American history from enslavement to mass incarceration.
One reason for continuing interest in lynching during its heyday of 1880-1930 is that the current political map of the two major parties reasonably approximates the division of states where lynching was and was not common, say Bailey and Tolnay.
Jason Miller's Langston Hughes and American Lynching Culture opens with this observation: "Langston Hughes never lived in an America where the very real threat of lynching did not exist" (1).
This provocative book, by seminal black liberation theologian James Cone, juxtaposes the cross of Jesus Christ and the legacy of lynching in United States history.
Jennie Lightweis-Goff, Tulane University At the keynote address to "Lynching and Racial Violence in America: Histories and Legacies," Emory University's 2002 conference, Fitzhugh Brundage famously suggested that the flourishing of scholarship on the subject was a kind of exhumation.