ma'am


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ma'am

 (măm)
n.
Used as a form of polite address for a woman: Will that be cash or charge, ma'am?

ma'am

(mæm; mɑːm; unstressed məm)
n
short for madam
Usage: Ma'am is used as a title of respect, especially when addressing female royalty
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ma'am - a woman of refinementma'am - a woman of refinement; "a chauffeur opened the door of the limousine for the grand lady"
grande dame - a middle-aged or elderly woman who is stylish and highly respected
madame - title used for a married Frenchwoman
adult female, woman - an adult female person (as opposed to a man); "the woman kept house while the man hunted"
Translations

ma'am

[ˈmæm] n (mainly US) (= madam) → Madame f
References in classic literature ?
What does he do, ma'am, but ask for a few coals; if it's only a pocket handkerchief full, he says
I'll speak to you a moment, ma'am, with your leave,' said Ralph.
If you send me away, ma'am," she said, "I won't take my character from you till I have told you the truth; I won't return your kindness by deceiving you a second time.
Why, ma'am,' he returned, 'I am thinking about Tom Gradgrind's whim;' Tom Gradgrind, for a bluff independent manner of speaking - as if somebody were always endeavouring to bribe him with immense sums to say Thomas, and he wouldn't; 'Tom Gradgrind's whim, ma'am, of bringing up the tumbling-girl.
It is an epitome, ma'am," said I, seeing my chance, "of your whole life," and with that I put her into my elbow-chair.
answers she: "upon my word, ma'am, I assure you, ma'am, upon my soul, ma'am, I am not.
Thank you, ma'am,' said Mr Pancks, 'such is my endeavour.
I don't know that it will be a girl, yet, ma'am,' said my mother innocently.
Ferrars myself, ma'am, this morning in Exeter, and his lady too, Miss Steele as was.
Pon my word, ma'am, I don't know what you are talking about.
Yes, ma'am; I will, ma'am," she stammered, righting the pitcher, and turning hastily.
an occasion indeed, ma'am, an occasion which does honour to me, ma'am, honour to me,' rejoined Mr Witherden, the notary.