mac


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Mac

 (măk)
n. Slang
Used as a form of address for a man whose name is unknown.

[From Mac-, a common prefix in Scottish and Irish surnames.]

MAC

abbr.
Military Airlift Command

mac

 (măk)
n. Chiefly British
A mackintosh.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mac

(mæk) or

mack

n
(Clothing & Fashion) informal Brit short for mackintosh1, mackintosh3

Mac

(mæk)
n
chiefly US and Canadian an informal term of address to a man
[C20: abstracted from Mac-, prefix of Scottish surnames]

Mac

(mæk)
n
(Computer Science) informal a Macintosh personal computer

MAC

abbreviation for
(Broadcasting) multiplexed analogue component: a transmission coding system for colour television using satellite broadcasting
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Mac-

or Mc-

a prefix found in family names of Irish or Scottish Gaelic origin.
[< Irish, Scottish Gaelic mac son]

Mac.

Maccabees.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

mac

(mӕk)
short for mackintosh.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.MAC - a waterproof raincoat made of rubberized fabricmac - a waterproof raincoat made of rubberized fabric
macintosh, mackintosh - a lightweight waterproof (usually rubberized) fabric
oilskin, slicker - a macintosh made from cotton fabric treated with oil and pigment to make it waterproof
raincoat, waterproof - a water-resistant coat
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
plášťenka
regnfrakke
sadetakki
kišni ogrtač
レインコート
레인코트
regnrock
ตัวย่อของเสื้อคลุมกันฝน
áo mưa

mac

[mæk] N
1. (Brit) (= mackintosh) → impermeable m; (= cagoule) → chubasquero m
2. (esp US) this way, Mac!¡por aquí, amigo!
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

mac

[ˈmæk] n (British)imper m, imperméable m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

mac

1
n (Brit inf) → Regenmantel m

mac

2
n (esp US inf) → Kumpel m (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

mac

[mæk] n abbr (Brit) (fam) =mackintoshimpermeabile m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

MAC

مِعْطَفٌ وَاْقِ مِنَ الْـمَطَرِ plášťenka regnfrakke Regenmantel αδιάβροχο impermeable sadetakki imperméable kišni ogrtač impermeabile レインコート 레인코트 regenjas regnkappe płaszcz nieprzemakalny capa impermeável макинтош regnrock ตัวย่อของเสื้อคลุมกันฝน yağmurluk áo mưa 马金托什雨衣
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

MAC

V. Mycobacterium avium complex.
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
He had been at a fast supper-party, given the night before by Captain the Honourable George Cinqbars, at his house in Brompton Square, to several young men of the regiment, and a number of ladies of the corps de ballet, and old Mac, who was at home with people of all ages and ranks, and consorted with generals, dog-fanciers, opera-dancers, bruisers, and every kind of person, in a word, was resting himself after the night's labours, and, not being on duty, was in bed.
"What the devil do you mean?" roared out Rawdon; "do you mean that you ever heard a fellow doubt about my wife and didn't tell me, Mac?"
"It was damned unfriendly, Mac," said Rawdon, quite overcome; and, covering his face with his hands, he gave way to an emotion, the sight of which caused the tough old campaigner opposite him to wince with sympathy.
This old fellow is Mac, the bookworm, called Worm for short.
Mac shook his hair out of his eyes, stumbled over a stool, and asked abruptly
Mac vanished from the room, and Steve, striking an attitude which displayed his costume effectively, said with an affable smile
"And while we're about it, I may mention casual that I got twenty thousand in Mac's safe, there, and there's twenty thousand more in the ground on Moosehide.
"Still a-crawling, Mac. You got me now, but that hunch is a rip-snorter persuadin' sort of a critter, and it's my plain duty to ride it.
Mac. But how do you propose to lay your hands on the so-called Porlock?"
Mac, the most practical thing that you ever did in your life would be to shut yourself up for three months and read twelve hours a day at the annals of crime.
It's going famously to-night, Mac. And what an audience!
Dear me, Mac, the girl couldn't possibly be better, you know."