macaque

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ma·caque

 (mə-kăk′, -käk′)
n.
Any of a diverse group of monkeys of the genus Macaca of Asia, Gibraltar, and northern Africa, and including the Barbary ape and the rhesus monkey.

[French, from Portuguese macaco, of Bantu origin; akin to Kongo makako, monkeys : ma-, pl. n. pref. + -kako, monkey.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

macaque

(məˈkɑːk)
n
(Animals) any of various Old World monkeys of the genus Macaca, inhabiting wooded or rocky regions of Asia and Africa. Typically the tail is short or absent and cheek pouches are present
[C17: from French, from Portuguese macaco, from Fiot (a W African language) makaku, from kaku monkey]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ma•caque

(məˈkæk, -ˈkɑk)

n.
any monkey of the genus Macaca, chiefly of Asia, characterized by cheek pouches and usu. a short tail.
[1690–1700; < French < Portuguese macaco monkey]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

macaque

- Based on Bantu kaku, "monkey," and ma, denoting a plural, translating to "some monkeys."
See also related terms for monkeys.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.macaque - short-tailed monkey of rocky regions of Asia and Africamacaque - short-tailed monkey of rocky regions of Asia and Africa
catarrhine, Old World monkey - of Africa or Arabia or Asia; having nonprehensile tails and nostrils close together
genus Macaca, Macaca - macaques; rhesus monkeys
Macaca mulatta, rhesus, rhesus monkey - of southern Asia; used in medical research
bonnet macaque, bonnet monkey, capped macaque, crown monkey, Macaca radiata - Indian macaque with a bonnet-like tuft of hair
Barbary ape, Macaca sylvana - tailless macaque of rocky cliffs and forests of northwestern Africa and Gibraltar
crab-eating macaque, croo monkey, Macaca irus - monkey of southeast Asia, Borneo and the Philippines
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

macaque

n (monkey) → Makak m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

macaque

[məˈkɑːk] n (animal) → macaco
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Macaques are considered as a good model used to study the postcranial skeleton in aging humans because they age at a rate of approximately 2.5-3.5 times that of humans (Tigges et al., 1988; Duncan et al., 2011).
Release date- 29072019 - A wild group of endangered Barbary macaques have been observed, for the first time, 'consoling' and adopting an injured juvenile from a neighbouring group.
Staff have been celebrating four primate births, including two adorable Barbary macaques, a critically endangered red ruffed lemur, and a cute ring tailed lemur.
"Daisy is being doted on by male macaques Oliver and Phil, returning to mummy Coral for feeding.
In Peninsular Malaysia, the estimated population of long-tailed macaques is about 125, 000 to about 135, 000 individuals with a population growth rate of 5% per annum (Osman, 1998; Karuppannan et al., 2014).
A group of friends were on their way to a mountain hike Thursday morning when they spotted about 20 Taiwanese macaques at the Renshan Botanical Garden, the Central News Agency reported.
We therefore evaluated Zika virus prevalence in long-tailed macaques (M.
Red-faced rhesus macaques have spread havoc, snatching food and mobile telephones, breaking into homes and terrorising people in and around the Indian capital.
Home to more than 700 long-tailed macaques, it is tucked deep in the forest covering approximately 10 hectares with a labyrinth composed of zigzagging water streams, hilly slopes, towering trees of around 115 different species, and three sacred Hindu temples.
"Since then Fota-born macaques have been sent to many zoos worldwide as part of the EEP."