macaroni


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Related to macaroni: macaroni salad, Macaroons

mac·a·ro·ni

 (măk′ə-rō′nē)
n.
1. pl. macaroni Pasta in any of various hollow shapes, especially short curved tubes.
2. pl. macaroni or mac·a·ro·nies
a. A well-traveled young Englishman of the 1700s and 1800s who affected foreign customs and manners.
b. A fop.

[Italian dialectal maccaroni, pl. of maccarone, small lump of pasta, piece of macaroni, variant of standard Italian maccheroni, pl. of maccherone, perhaps from Greek makariā, barley groats in soup or sauce, especially as served at funeral meals (from makarios, blessed, favored by the gods, from makar, blessed, of unknown origin) or from Byzantine Greek makariōneia, funeral chant (perhaps also formerly used by Greek communities in Italy to designate a funeral meal) : Greek makarios, blessed + aiōnios, eternal (from aiōn, eon; see eon). Sense 2, from the notion that such young men acquired a taste for macaroni while in Italy on the grand tour .]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

macaroni

(ˌmækəˈrəʊnɪ) or

maccaroni

n, pl -nis or -nies
1. (Cookery) pasta tubes made from wheat flour
2. (Historical Terms) (in 18th-century Britain) a dandy who affected foreign manners and style
[C16: from Italian (Neapolitan dialect) maccarone, probably from Greek makaria food made from barley]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mac•a•ro•ni

(ˌmæk əˈroʊ ni)

n., pl. -nis, -nies.
1. small tubular pasta made of wheat flour.
2. an English dandy of the 18th century affecting Continental ways.
[1590–1600; < dial. Italian maccaroni, pl. of maccarone]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Macaroni

 a medley; poetic selections.
Example: political songs in Latin or in a maccaroni of Latin and English, 1884.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.macaroni - a British dandy in the 18th century who affected Continental mannerismsmacaroni - a British dandy in the 18th century who affected Continental mannerisms; "Yankee Doodle stuck a feather in his cap and called it macaroni"
dandy, fashion plate, fop, gallant, sheik, dude, beau, clotheshorse, swell - a man who is much concerned with his dress and appearance
2.macaroni - pasta in the form of slender tubesmacaroni - pasta in the form of slender tubes  
alimentary paste, pasta - shaped and dried dough made from flour and water and sometimes egg
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
مَعكَرونهمَكَرُونَةٌ
makaronymakaróny
makaroni
makaronimakarooni
makaroni
makaróni
makkaróna, hveitipípa
マカロニ
마카로니
makaronai
makaroni
makaróny
makaroner
มะกะโรนี
çubuk makarnamakarna
mì ống macaroni

macaroni

[ˌmækəˈrəʊnɪ]
A. Nmacarrones mpl
B. CPD macaroni cheese Nmacarrones mpl gratinados (con queso)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

macaroni

[ˌmækəˈrəʊni] nmacaronis mplmacaroni cheese macaroni and cheese (US) ngratin m de macaronis
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

macaroni

nMakkaroni pl
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

macaroni

[ˌmækəˈrəʊnɪ] nmaccheroni mpl
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

macaroni

(mӕkəˈrəuni) noun
a form of pasta, pressed out to form tubes, and dried. The macaroni is over-cooked.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

macaroni

مَكَرُونَةٌ makarony makaroni Makkaroni μακαρόνια macarrones makaroni macaroni makaroni maccheroni マカロニ 마카로니 macaroni makaroni makaron macarrão макароны makaroner มะกะโรนี makarna mì ống macaroni 通心面
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
There he established a little hostelry, in which was fabricated a macaroni so delicious that people came from miles round to fetch it or eat it.
The dish of macaroni was left upon the table, only just tasted by the royal mouth.
This double favor, of a strangulation and a macaroni, conferred upon the triangular house, gave poor Cropoli a fancy to grace his hostelry with a pompous title.
When he found himself about to die, which happened in 1643, just after the death of Louis XIII., he called to him his son, a young cook of great promise, and with tears in his eyes, he recommended him to preserve carefully the secret of the macaroni, to Frenchify his name, and at length, when the political horizon should be cleared from the clouds which obscured it -- this was practiced then as in our day, to order of the nearest smith a handsome sign, upon which a famous painter, whom he named, should design two queens' portraits, with these words as a legend: "To The Medici."
Pittrino, grateful, and fed with macaroni, set about propagating the reputation of this national dish, and from the time of its founder, he had rendered, with his indefatigable tongue, signal services to the house of Cropoli.
Besides this, it was he who tasted the macaroni, to maintain the pure flavor of the ancient tradition; and it must be allowed that he never permitted a grain of pepper too much, or an atom of parmesan too little.
Well do I remember that flaming Jew's "With the last breath all is done: joy, love, sorrow, macaroni, the theatre, lime-trees, raspberry drops, the power of human relations, gossip, the barking of dogs, champagne."
He tried the straw, but, as he chewed away at it, he noticed to his great disappointment that it tasted neither like rice nor like macaroni.
Broken bread and scraps of frozen macaroni lay upon the cloth and at the bottom of two soup-plates and a tureen; the macaroni had a tinge of tomato; and there was a crimson dram left in the tumblers, with an empty fiasco to show whence it came.
some like ham and some like lamb And some like macaroni; But bring me in a pail of gin And a tub of abalone.
He had been a macaroni of the eighteenth century, and the friend, in his youth, of Lord Ferrars.
So, bit by bit, the feast takes form--there is a ham and a dish of sauerkraut, boiled rice, macaroni, bologna sausages, great piles of penny buns, bowls of milk, and foaming pitchers of beer.