macerate

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mac·er·ate

 (măs′ə-rāt′)
v. mac·er·at·ed, mac·er·at·ing, mac·er·ates
v.tr.
1. To make soft by soaking or steeping in a liquid.
2. To separate into constituents by soaking.
3. To cause to become lean, usually by starvation; emaciate.
v.intr.
To become soft or separated into constituents by soaking: "allowed the juice and skins of the white grapes to macerate together overnight before pressing" (Gerald Asher).
n. (-ĭt)
A substance prepared or produced by macerating.

[Latin mācerāre, mācerāt-; see mag- in Indo-European roots.]

mac′er·a′tion n.
mac′er·a′tor, mac′er·at′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

macerate

(ˈmæsəˌreɪt)
vb
1. (General Physics) to soften or separate or be softened or separated as a result of soaking
2. (Cookery) to break up or cause to break up by soaking: macerated peaches.
3. to become or cause to become thin
[C16: from Latin mācerāre to soften]
ˈmacerˌater, ˈmacerˌator n
ˈmacerative adj
ˌmacerˈation n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mac•er•ate

(ˈmæs əˌreɪt)

v. -at•ed, -at•ing. v.t.
1. to soften or separate into parts by steeping in a liquid.
2. to cause to grow thin or waste away.
v.i.
3. to become macerated.
[1540–50; < Latin mācerātus, past participle of mācerāre to soak, steep, weaken]
mac`er•a′tion, n.
mac′er•a`tive, adj.
mac′er•a`tor, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

macerate

- Meaning "to soften," it comes from Greek massein, "knead."
See also related terms for soften.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

macerate


Past participle: macerated
Gerund: macerating

Imperative
macerate
macerate
Present
I macerate
you macerate
he/she/it macerates
we macerate
you macerate
they macerate
Preterite
I macerated
you macerated
he/she/it macerated
we macerated
you macerated
they macerated
Present Continuous
I am macerating
you are macerating
he/she/it is macerating
we are macerating
you are macerating
they are macerating
Present Perfect
I have macerated
you have macerated
he/she/it has macerated
we have macerated
you have macerated
they have macerated
Past Continuous
I was macerating
you were macerating
he/she/it was macerating
we were macerating
you were macerating
they were macerating
Past Perfect
I had macerated
you had macerated
he/she/it had macerated
we had macerated
you had macerated
they had macerated
Future
I will macerate
you will macerate
he/she/it will macerate
we will macerate
you will macerate
they will macerate
Future Perfect
I will have macerated
you will have macerated
he/she/it will have macerated
we will have macerated
you will have macerated
they will have macerated
Future Continuous
I will be macerating
you will be macerating
he/she/it will be macerating
we will be macerating
you will be macerating
they will be macerating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been macerating
you have been macerating
he/she/it has been macerating
we have been macerating
you have been macerating
they have been macerating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been macerating
you will have been macerating
he/she/it will have been macerating
we will have been macerating
you will have been macerating
they will have been macerating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been macerating
you had been macerating
he/she/it had been macerating
we had been macerating
you had been macerating
they had been macerating
Conditional
I would macerate
you would macerate
he/she/it would macerate
we would macerate
you would macerate
they would macerate
Past Conditional
I would have macerated
you would have macerated
he/she/it would have macerated
we would have macerated
you would have macerated
they would have macerated
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

macerate

To soak food in a liquid.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.macerate - separate into constituents by soakingmacerate - separate into constituents by soaking
macerate - become soft or separate and disintegrate as a result of excessive soaking; "the tissue macerated in the water"
separate - divide into components or constituents; "Separate the wheat from the chaff"
2.macerate - become soft or separate and disintegrate as a result of excessive soaking; "the tissue macerated in the water"
soften - become soft or softer; "The bread will soften if you pour some liquid on it"
macerate - separate into constituents by soaking
3.macerate - soften, usually by steeping in liquid, and cause to disintegrate as a result; "macerate peaches"; "the gizzards macerates the food in the digestive system"
soften - make soft or softer; "This liquid will soften your laundry"
4.macerate - cause to grow thin or weak; "The treatment emaciated him"
debilitate, enfeeble, drain - make weak; "Life in the camp drained him"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

macerate

verb soften, soak, steep, squash, pulp, mash, infuse I like to macerate the food in liqueur for a few minutes before serving.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
macero

macerate

[ˈmæsəreɪt]
A. VTmacerar
B. VImacerar(se)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

macerate

[ˈmæsəreɪt]
vt (= marinate) → faire macérer
vi [food] → macérer
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

macerate

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

macerate

[ˈmæsəˌreɪt]
1. vtmacerare
2. vimacerarsi
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

mac·er·ate

v. macerar; suavizar una materia por medio de inmersión en un líquido.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

macerate

vt macerar; vi macerarse; macerated tissue..tejido macerado
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
That evening when he went home, he looked at his phials to see how a process of maceration was going on, with undisturbed interest; and he wrote out his daily notes with as much precision as usual.
(See, also, my monograph, The Essential Identity of the Spiritual Affections and Certain Intestinal Gases Freed in Digestion -- 4to, 687 pp.) In a scientific work entitled, I believe, Delectatio Demonorum (John Camden Hotton, London, 1873) this view of the sentiments receives a striking illustration; and for further light consult Professor Dam's famous treatise on Love as a Product of Alimentary Maceration .
A confessor had, for the last three years, directed Mademoiselle Cormon rather stupidly in the path of maceration; he advised the use of scourging, which, if modern medical science is to be believed, produces an effect quite the contrary to that expected by the worthy priest, whose hygienic knowledge was not extensive.
Instead of 24-hour macerations as often seen in other gins, this paarticular product has a much longer and slower maceration that the producer say they gradually layers in botanicals according to their optimal maceration time: the longest being six weeks.
All the winemakers perform cold-soak macerations with length of maceration averaging between two to nine days and temperatures between 40[degrees]-59[degrees] F.
Roger) Boulton (at the University of California, Davis) has been talking about this subject for 30 years, and with wineries that do extended macerations, this seems to be a substantial problem.
Finally, for the production winemaker, we have the ability to monitor macerations by the day or by the hour, ensure that maceration protocols are being followed by the cellar, and adjust to yearly variations of the grape supply.
THE region's top cocktail shakers are battling it out today to secure a place in the London final of the Belvedere Macerations competition.
transversa follicles are placed directly in the drug without preincubating the ovary prior to maceration. Maturation percentages are reduced, however, if the ovary is immersed in the drug for 1-2 h before maceration, particularly in the case of heptanol, which may use a more rapid mechanism of uncoupling than does AGA.