mackerel shark

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Related to mackerel sharks: family Lamnidae, Requiem sharks

mackerel shark

n.
Any of various large sharks of the family Lamnidae, including the great white shark, mako, and porbeagle, having a pointed snout with large teeth and a crescent-shaped tail.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mackerel shark

n
(Animals) another name for porbeagle
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mack′erel shark`


n.
any of several fierce sharks of the family Lamnidae, including the great white shark and the mako.
[1810–20]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mackerel shark - fierce pelagic and oceanic sharksmackerel shark - fierce pelagic and oceanic sharks  
shark - any of numerous elongate mostly marine carnivorous fishes with heterocercal caudal fins and tough skin covered with small toothlike scales
family Lamnidae, Lamnidae - oceanic sharks
Lamna nasus, porbeagle - voracious pointed-nose shark of northern Atlantic and Pacific
mako, mako shark - powerful mackerel shark of the Atlantic and Pacific
Carcharodon carcharias, great white shark, man-eating shark, white shark, man-eater - large aggressive shark widespread in warm seas; known to attack humans
basking shark, Cetorhinus maximus - large harmless plankton-eating northern shark; often swims slowly or floats at the sea surface
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lamnids are strong and powerful predators who are dubbed mackerel sharks. This is due to some morphological aspects that they have in common with bony fishes belonging to the Scombridae family.
Most sharks are cold-blooded, with the exception of the family Alopiidae or thresher sharks (Alopias spp.), and most of the mackerel sharks. Shortfin makos are partially warm-blooded (the longfin mako does not appear to be warm-blooded).
For example, fast-swimming mackerel sharks have a large, conico-cylindrical shape; benthic cat sharks have long, slender bodies; and benthic angel sharks and saw sharks are highly flattened in shape.