mackintosh


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mack·in·tosh

also mac·in·tosh  (măk′ĭn-tŏsh′)
n. Chiefly British
1. A raincoat.
2. A lightweight, waterproof fabric that was originally of rubberized wool or cotton.

[After Charles Macintosh (1766-1843), Scottish inventor.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

mackintosh

(ˈmækɪnˌtɒʃ) or

macintosh

n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a waterproof raincoat made of rubberized cloth
2. (Textiles) such cloth
3. (Clothing & Fashion) any raincoat
[C19: named after Charles Macintosh (1760–1843), who invented it]

Mackintosh

(ˈmækɪnˌtɒʃ)
n
1. (Biography) Sir Cameron (Anthony). born 1946, British producer of musicals and theatre owner; his productions include Cats (1981), Les Misérables (1985), Miss Saigon (1987), and My Fair Lady (2001)
2. (Biography) Charles Rennie. 1868–1928, Scottish architect and artist, exponent of the Art Nouveau style; designer of the Glasgow School of Art (1896)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mack•in•tosh

or mac•in•tosh

(ˈmæk ɪnˌtɒʃ)

n.
1. Chiefly Brit. raincoat.
2. a lightweight, waterproof, orig. rubberized cotton fabric.
[1830–40; after Charles Macintosh (1766–1843), Scottish inventor]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Mackintosh

A waterproof overcoat. Originally a rainproof coat made by laminating two pieces of cotton cloth using a solution of rubber and naphtha. The process was invented by Charles Macintosh and patented in 1823.
1001 Words and Phrases You Never Knew You Didn’t Know by W.R. Runyan Copyright © 2011 by W.R. Runyan
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Mackintosh - a lightweight waterproof (usually rubberized) fabricmackintosh - a lightweight waterproof (usually rubberized) fabric
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
mac, mack, mackintosh, macintosh - a waterproof raincoat made of rubberized fabric
2.Mackintosh - a waterproof raincoat made of rubberized fabricmackintosh - a waterproof raincoat made of rubberized fabric
macintosh, mackintosh - a lightweight waterproof (usually rubberized) fabric
oilskin, slicker - a macintosh made from cotton fabric treated with oil and pigment to make it waterproof
raincoat, waterproof - a water-resistant coat
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
مِعْطَف واقٍ من المَطَر
nepromokavý plášť
regnfrakke
regnfrakki
neperšlampamas apsiaustas
lietusmētelis

mackintosh

[ˈmækɪntɒʃ] Nimpermeable m; (= cagoule) → chubasquero m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

mackintosh

[ˈmækɪntɒʃ] n (British)imperméable m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

mackintosh

nRegenmantel m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

mackintosh

[ˈmækɪnˌtɒʃ] nimpermeabile m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

mackintosh

(ˈmӕkintoʃ) noun
a waterproof overcoat, especially made of plastic material.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Bring down my mackintosh and traveling-cloak, and some stout shoes, though we shall do little walking.
I pawned my watch, my bicycle, and a mackintosh of which my father had been very proud and which he had left to me.
THE NORTHERN REVIEW took his essay, "The Cradle of Beauty," and MACKINTOSH'S MAGAZINE took "The Palmist" - the poem he had written to Marian.
All the time she felt conscious of the observation of a small man clad in a huge mackintosh, whose peaked cap completely obscured his features.
Black leather shoes, dirty; suit of boating flannels, very dirty; brown felt hat, much battered; mackintosh, very wet; umbrella.
With many a smile she produced two of those mackintosh squares that protect the frame of the tourist from damp grass or cold marble steps.
She closed the stove door with a bang, and approaching, assisted in removing Edna's dripping mackintosh.
Mr, Crimsworth, having removed his mackintosh, sat down by the fire.
Dyott, left alone, moved with an air of selection to the window, and it was as so stationed, gazing out at the wild weather, that the visitor, whose delay to appear spoke of the wiping of boots and the disposal of drenched mackintosh and cap, finally found her.
"If you will give me five minutes to fetch my mackintosh and galoshes, it would interest me to see whether I have profited by the lessons I took in Scotland."
She was so intent upon these thoughts that she hardly at first took note of a man in a white mackintosh whom she saw riding down the street.
Good took off his clothes, shook them, put his eye-glass and his false teeth into his trousers pocket, and folding each article neatly, placed it out of the dew under a corner of his mackintosh sheet.