macrocosm


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mac·ro·cosm

 (măk′rə-kŏz′əm)
n.
1. The entire world; the universe.
2. A system reflecting on a large scale one of its component systems or parts.

[Medieval Latin macrocosmus : Greek makro-, macro- + Greek kosmos, world.]

mac′ro·cos′mic adj.
mac′ro·cos′mic·al·ly adv.

macrocosm

(ˈmækrəˌkɒzəm)
n
1. a complex structure, such as the universe or society, regarded as an entirety, as opposed to microcosms, which have a similar structure and are contained within it
2. any complex entity regarded as a complete system in itself
[C16: via French and Latin from Greek makros kosmos great world]
ˌmacroˈcosmic adj
ˌmacroˈcosmically adv

mac•ro•cosm

(ˈmæk rəˌkɒz əm)

n.
the universe considered as a whole (opposed to microcosm).
[1590–1600; (< Middle French) < Medieval Latin macrocosmus; see macro-, cosmos]
mac`ro•cos′mic, adj.
mac`ro•cos′mi•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.macrocosm - everything that exists anywheremacrocosm - everything that exists anywhere; "they study the evolution of the universe"; "the biggest tree in existence"
natural object - an object occurring naturally; not made by man
extragalactic nebula, galaxy - (astronomy) a collection of star systems; any of the billions of systems each having many stars and nebulae and dust; "`extragalactic nebula' is a former name for `galaxy'"
celestial body, heavenly body - natural objects visible in the sky
closed universe - (cosmology) a universe that is spatially closed and in which there is sufficient matter to halt the expansion that began with the big bang; the visible matter is only 10 percent of the matter required for closure but there may be large amounts of dark matter
estraterrestrial body, extraterrestrial object - a natural object existing outside the earth and outside the earth's atmosphere
natural order - the physical universe considered as an orderly system subject to natural (not human or supernatural) laws
nature - the natural physical world including plants and animals and landscapes etc.; "they tried to preserve nature as they found it"

macrocosm

noun
The totality of all existing things:
Translations
macrocosmos
macrocosmmacrocosmos

macrocosm

[ˈmækrəʊkɒzəm] Nmacrocosmo m

macrocosm

[ˈmækrəʊkɒzəm] n [universe, society] → macrocosme m

macrocosm

nMakrokosmos m; the macrocosm of Italian societydie italienische Gesellschaft als ganzes or in ihrer Gesamtheit

macrocosm

[ˈmækrəˌkɒzəm] nmacrocosmo

macrocosm

n. macrocosmo.
1. el universo como representación del ser humano;
2. el universo considerado como un todo.
References in periodicals archive ?
It celebrates the range of poetic possibilities in movement, drawing on methodologies from internal and external movement disciplines, psyche and soma, and explores the visually rich and resonant connections between the microcosm and the macrocosm.
The piece investigates a range of poetic possibilities, using the visually rich and resonant connections between internal and external worlds, the microcosm and the macrocosm.
Coming from the macrocosm to the microcosm, all great prophets, sages, mystics and enlightened personalities are often called 'lights' or the 'Tower of Light'.
In the proposed research we aim to answer these two key questions using four innovative experimental systems: 1) a small laboratory microfluidic system for the precise control and manipulation of microbial biofilms; 2) an in situ river mesocosm and 3) ex situ macrocosm which can also control and manipulate microbial biofilms under controlled conditions with the addition of antibiotics and/or antibiotic resistance genes; and finally 4) the use of the freshwater shrimp, Gammarus pulex, as an indicator species of environments where the reservoir of antibiotic resistance is elevated.
One huge influence on me is Friedrich Hayek's The Fatal Conceit, where he has the microcosm and the macrocosm. The microcosm is the world of intimate relationships.
International relations, while often fantastically abstract of individual lives, are only an output and macrocosm of seven billion lives lived overwhelmingly on highly gendered terms.
Instead, Pavese took on the major themes of the Greek "macrocosm" by translating the tragedies of Aeschylus and Sophocles, along with the poetry of Sappho, Anacreon, and Pindar, among others.
Their shared title offered a point of entry into the logic behind Amir's rapturous material abstractions; indeed, it could have served as the name of the show: See the Macrocosm in Microvision.
Mulinge, Arasa, and Wawire offer pragmatic solutions for the enhancement of participation by all stake holders of this vital sector of KenyaAEs development engine, and find that university students, and, by implication, their involvement in governance processes, are a macrocosm of the larger Kenyan society.
How these cooperative relationships established new resources and new building blocks leading to more advanced creatures, and what these studies imply for human evolution and ongoing efforts of human communities to form symbiotic, cooperative relationships lends to a title that takes the macrocosm of scientific analysis and expands it into the social questions of our times on new technologies and their ultimate impact on human evolution.
The Paris-based artist grew up in Dubai, and in her latest show in the city, "When Heartstrings Collapse", she has used images of her own skin cells to investigate the perception of boundaries and proportion between interior and exterior, microcosm and macrocosm. Her photographic works and sculptures invite viewers to contemplate the unknown world inside our own body, how it is manifested on the surface, and how it is connected to the world around it.
What is for certain, though, is social media is a fluid and evolving macrocosm of communications.