macrofossil


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mac·ro·fos·sil

 (măk′rō-fŏs′əl)
n.
A fossil large enough to be examined without a microscope.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

macrofossil

(ˈmækrəʊˌfɒsəl)
n
(Palaeontology) a fossil visible to the naked eye
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The lack of macrofossil plant remains do not rule out or indicate that the area could have been a wetland in the past.
Sirna, "Upper Cretaceous ramp limestones from the Sorrento Peninsula (southern Apennines, Italy): Micro- and macrofossil associations and their significance in the depositional sequences," Sedimentary Geology, vol.
While the results of faunal, insect, pollen, and macrofossil studies have been published elsewhere, it is notable that references to these works serve as a valuable introduction to these related studies.
These authors also mentioned the occurrence of important macrofossil associations near the city of Pamplona.
In the research, four different types of archaeological documents were examined: the macrofossil remains of the leaves, fruits or seeds of psychoactive plants; residues suggestive of alcoholic beverages; psychoactive alkaloids found in archaeological artifacts and skeletal remains from prehistoric times; and artistic depictions of mood-altering plant species and drinking scenes.
Some of these species are proven relics, based on macrofossil and pollen evidences (BIRKS & WILLIS, 2008).
This alternation has quite changed into calcite megacrysts upward, lacking any macrofossil. However, its main foraminifers are Asterigerina rotula (Kaufmann et.
The identification of >40 taxa of plant macrofossil in 14 rodent middens collected from 2, 800 to 3,590 m at the latitude of Arica (18[degrees]S) provided snapshots of vegetation in the northermost Atacama desert over the past 3000 years.
The flora and fauna of this shale is dominated by the microfossil groups foraminifera, radiolaria, diatoms, and macrofossil groups like filamentous algae, cetaceans, sirenians, pinnipeds, fish, birds, ostracod crustaceans, bivalves, gastropods, bryozoans, polychaetes, leaves, and woody plant debris (Buckeridge & Finger 2001).