macrophysics

mac·ro·phys·ics

 (măk′rō-fĭz′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The branch of physics that deals with objects and phenomena large enough to be measured and observed.

macrophysics

(ˌmækrəʊˈfɪzɪks)
n
(General Physics) (functioning as singular) the branch of physics concerned with macroscopic systems and objects
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References in periodicals archive ?
Early results show that models with a resolution of around 100 m are capable of reproducing the local-scale variability that can lead to the onset and development of radiation fog, and also have identified deficiencies in aerosol activation, turbulence, and cloud micro- and macrophysics, in model parameterizations.
Han contends that throughout history, societies have evolved from a macrophysics (Makrophysik) to a microphysics (Mikrophysik) of violence.
This temporal scale, like the spatial nanoscale is intermediate between micro- and macroworld making the standard approaches developed in micro- and macrophysics not suitable anymore.
which convinced me--and still does--that this essential connection between macrophysics and microphysics also precludes strict determinism ...
Afterwards, it appeared that the geometrization philosophy is successful in the domain of macrophysics while microphysics is the domain of success of the quantization philosophy (the domain of short range forces).
Wigner (41) stated the issue succinctly: Modern microphysics and macrophysics no longer deal with relations among observables but only with relations among observations
If this proposition corresponds to the facts, then one could think that redshift quantization is an imprint of generalized quantization in various scales from microphysics to macrophysics, just as Tifft once put it [2]: "The redshift has imprinted on it a pattern that appears to have its origin in microscopic quantum physics, yet it carries this imprint across cosmological boundaries".
A presumed reduction of chemistry to traditional quantum mechanics implies an explanation of the properties and the behavior of substances in terms of electrons and nuclei, hence also a successful reduction of macrophysics. Such a reduction would be a triumph indeed; it would, for example, include the resolution of the notorious "measurement problem of quantum mechanics," which is known to have no solution within the mathematical and conceptual framework of traditional quantum mechanics.
The central issues about consciousness, and the central issues that divide us from Block and Stalnaker, arise equally whether one starts with microphysics or macrophysics, and so are unaffected by such a stipulation.
"Given the microscopic size of the organisms, even a few connected pores, which do not affect the macrophysics of the system measurably, can decide the fate of a group of organisms," Eicken remarks.
In macrophysics, of course, "anything goes" will not work, nor in quantum physics either, and no one can take the complementarity theory to mean that from now on everything is decided subjectively.
The laws that relate pressure, temperature, and volumes of gases are macrophysics. The 'ideal-gas laws' can be derived from a micromodel: gas molecules are assumed to be point masses, subject to conservation of momentum, with a distribution of velocities.