macrosociology


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macrosociology

(ˌmækrəʊˌsəʊsɪˈɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Sociology) the branch of sociology concerned with the study of human societies on a wide scale
ˌmacroˌsocioˈlogical adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
(79.) See, e.g., Traum, supra note 31, at 427 (identifying mass incarceration as "a group and systemic problem, not merely an individual problem"); Bruce Western 8t Christopher Muller, Mass Incarceration, Macrosociology, and the Poor, 647 ANNALS AM.
His insights in the macrosociology of power, knowledge, and socio-economic formation have shed a light on the similarities between Eastern and Western development.
Center and Periphery: Essays in Macrosociology. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1975.
2013 "Mass incarceration, Macrosociology, and the Poor." The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 647: 166-89.
Part 2 discusses the impact of the 2008 Great Recession on macrosociology and social values, charting the recessionAEs impact on the spread of social values favoring hedonism, materialism, consumption, and short-term rewards.
Human societies: An introduction to macrosociology (3rd ed).
On the microfoundations of macrosociology. American Journal of Sociology, 86, 984-1014.
Faust draws on Gerhard and Jean Lenski's Human Societies: An Introduction to Macrosociology (1974) in classifying both northern and southern kingdoms as "states": an "advanced agrarian society" in Israel and a "simple agrarian society" in Judah (because, according to this analysis, it lacked a middle class).
While macrosociology risks seeing these trends as abstract entities that exist outside the individuals, who vote on lustration, meta-analysis allows observation of large scale patterns and widespread social processes.