macrosociology


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macrosociology

(ˌmækrəʊˌsəʊsɪˈɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Sociology) the branch of sociology concerned with the study of human societies on a wide scale
ˌmacroˌsocioˈlogical adj
References in periodicals archive ?
Part 2 discusses the impact of the 2008 Great Recession on macrosociology and social values, charting the recessionAEs impact on the spread of social values favoring hedonism, materialism, consumption, and short-term rewards.
Human societies: An introduction to macrosociology (3rd ed).
Faust draws on Gerhard and Jean Lenski's Human Societies: An Introduction to Macrosociology (1974) in classifying both northern and southern kingdoms as "states": an "advanced agrarian society" in Israel and a "simple agrarian society" in Judah (because, according to this analysis, it lacked a middle class).
While macrosociology risks seeing these trends as abstract entities that exist outside the individuals, who vote on lustration, meta-analysis allows observation of large scale patterns and widespread social processes.
Human Societies: An Introduction to Macrosociology, Eleventh Edition, Boulder: Paradigm Publishers.
Its themes centered on the concerns central to Porter's macrosociology of Canada: class, elites, education, occupational prestige and attainment, and social mobility--all of them framed as analytic means for comprehending the shape and form of Canadian society.
Self, War & Society: George Herbert Mead s Macrosociology, New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers.
Human societies; an introduction to macrosociology, 11th ed.
SHILS, Edward (1975) Center and periphery: essays in Macrosociology.
Self, war, & society: George Herbert Mead's macrosociology.