welkin

(redirected from made the welkin ring)
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Related to made the welkin ring: make the welkin ring

wel·kin

 (wĕl′kĭn)
n. Archaic
1. The vault of heaven; the sky.
2. The upper air.

[Middle English welken, from Old English wolcen, weolcen, cloud.]

welkin

(ˈwɛlkɪn)
n
(Astronomy) archaic the sky, heavens, or upper air
[Old English wolcen, welcen; related to Old Frisian wolken, Old Saxon, Old High German wolcan]

wel•kin

(ˈwɛl kɪn)

n. Chiefly Literary.
the sky; the vault of heaven.
[before 900; Middle English welken(e), Old English welcn, variant of wolcen cloud, sky]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.welkin - the apparent surface of the imaginary sphere on which celestial bodies appear to be projectedwelkin - the apparent surface of the imaginary sphere on which celestial bodies appear to be projected
apex of the sun's way, solar apex, apex - the point on the celestial sphere toward which the sun and solar system appear to be moving relative to the fixed stars
celestial point - a point in the heavens (on the celestial sphere)
nadir - the point below the observer that is directly opposite the zenith on the imaginary sphere against which celestial bodies appear to be projected
surface - the extended two-dimensional outer boundary of a three-dimensional object; "they skimmed over the surface of the water"; "a brush small enough to clean every dental surface"; "the sun has no distinct surface"
zenith - the point above the observer that is directly opposite the nadir on the imaginary sphere against which celestial bodies appear to be projected
zodiac - a belt-shaped region in the heavens on either side to the ecliptic; divided into 12 constellations or signs for astrological purposes

welkin

noun
Archaic. The celestial regions as seen from the earth:
air, firmament, heaven (often used in plural), sky.
References in classic literature ?
While the chiefs thus revelled in hall, and made the rafters resound with bursts of loyalty and old Scottish songs, chanted in voices cracked and sharpened by the northern blast, their merriment was echoed and prolonged by a mongrel legion of retainers, Canadian voyageurs, half-breeds, Indian hunters, and vagabond hangers-on who feasted sumptuously without on the crumbs that fell from their table, and made the welkin ring with old French ditties, mingled with Indian yelps and yellings.
Don Quixote, then, having, as has been said, planted himself in the middle of the road, made the welkin ring with words to this effect: "Ho ye travellers and wayfarers, knights, squires, folk on foot or on horseback, who pass this way or shall pass in the course of the next two days

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