madhouse


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mad·house

 (măd′hous′)
n.
1. Offensive An institution for the mentally ill.
2. Informal A place of great disorder and confusion.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

madhouse

(ˈmædˌhaʊs)
n
1. a mental hospital or asylum
2. a state of uproar or confusion
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mad•house

(ˈmædˌhaʊs)

n., pl. -hous•es (-ˌhaʊ zɪz)
1. a hospital for the mentally disturbed.
2. a disorderly, often noisy place.
[1680–90]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.madhouse - pejorative terms for an insane asylummadhouse - pejorative terms for an insane asylum
mental home, mental hospital, mental institution, psychiatric hospital, insane asylum, asylum, institution - a hospital for mentally incompetent or unbalanced person
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

madhouse

noun
1. (Informal) chaos, turmoil, bedlam, Babel That place is a madhouse.
2. (Old-fashioned) mental hospital, psychiatric hospital, mental institution, lunatic asylum, funny farm (facetious), insane asylum, loony bin (slang), nuthouse (slang), rubber room (U.S. slang), laughing academy (U.S. slang) It was said that he was 'ripe for the madhouse'.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

madhouse

[ˈmædhaʊs] N (madhouses (pl)) [ˈmædhaʊzɪz]manicomio m, casa f de locos
this is a madhouse!¡esto es una casa de locos!
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

madhouse

[ˈmædhaʊs] nmaison f de fous
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

madhouse

n (lit, fig)Irrenhaus nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

madhouse

[ˈmædhaʊs] n (also fig) → manicomio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

madhouse

n. manicomio, asilo de locos.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
"In the madhouse at Seville there was a man whom his relations had placed there as being out of his mind.
"Couldst thou have thought there were such merry times in a madhouse?" inquired the latter.
"The workhouse first, perhaps--and then the madhouse. What is there to surprise you in that?
She was locked up in a madhouse, in a little town in Germany, at the time her relatives, thinking her dead, divided her property.
At times I fancy that I must be mad; that somewhere I am sitting in a madhouse; that these events have merely SEEMED to happen; that still they merely SEEM to be happening.
He took my carriage very ill, and indeed he might well do so, for at last I refused to bed with him, and carrying on the breach upon all occasions to extremity, he told me once he thought I was mad, and if I did not alter my conduct, he would put me under cure; that is to say, into a madhouse. I told him he should find I was far enough from mad, and that it was not in his power, or any other villain's, to murder me.
This is the Court of Chancery, which has its decaying houses and its blighted lands in every shire, which has its worn-out lunatic in every madhouse and its dead in every churchyard, which has its ruined suitor with his slipshod heels and threadbare dress borrowing and begging through the round of every man's acquaintance, which gives to monied might the means abundantly of wearying out the right, which so exhausts finances, patience, courage, hope, so overthrows the brain and breaks the heart, that there is not an honourable man among its practitioners who would not give--who does not often give--the warning, "Suffer any wrong that can be done you rather than come here!"
Both sides were cursing and swearing in a frightful manner, which, together with the reports of the firearms and the screams and groans of the wounded, turned the deck of the Fuwalda to the likeness of a madhouse.
Soon we shot in quick succession, past a light- house; a madhouse (how the lunatics flung up their caps and roared in sympathy with the headlong engine and the driving tide!); a jail; and other buildings: and so emerged into a noble bay, whose waters sparkled in the now cloudless sunshine like Nature's eyes turned up to Heaven.
The palace, the night-cellar, the jail, the madhouse: the chambers of birth and death, of health and sickness, the rigid face of the corpse and the calm sleep of the child: midnight was upon them all.
She told him all--that they had no friend or relative--that she had fled with the old man, to save him from a madhouse and all the miseries he dreaded--that she was flying now, to save him from himself-- and that she sought an asylum in some remote and primitive place, where the temptation before which he fell would never enter, and her late sorrows and distresses could have no place.
"There are three ways before her," he thought, "the canal, the madhouse, or .