Madison

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Mad·i·son

 (măd′ĭ-sən)
The capital of Wisconsin, in the south-central part of the state west of Milwaukee. It was chosen as territorial capital in 1836 and settled the same year. The main branch of the University of Wisconsin (founded 1848) is here.

madison

(ˈmædɪsən)
n
(Cycle Racing) a type of cycle relay race
[C20: from Madison Square Gardens in New York City, early venue for such races]

Madison

(ˈmædɪsən)
n
(Placename) a city in the US, in S central Wisconsin, on an isthmus between Lakes Mendota and Monona: the state capital. Pop: 218 432 (2003 est)

Madison

(ˈmædɪsən)
n
(Biography) James. 1751–1836, US statesman; 4th president of the US (1809–17). He helped to draft the US Constitution and Bill of Rights. His presidency was dominated by the War of 1812

Mad•i•son

(ˈmæd ə sən)

n.
1. Dolly or Dolley (Dorothea Payne), 1768–1849, wife of James Madison.
2. James, 1751–1836, 4th president of the U.S. 1809–17.
3. the capital of Wisconsin, in the S part. 197,630.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Madison - 4th President of the United StatesMadison - 4th President of the United States; member of the Continental Congress and rapporteur at the Constitutional Convention in 1776; helped frame the Bill of Rights (1751-1836)
2.Madison - capital of the state of WisconsinMadison - capital of the state of Wisconsin; located in the southern part of state; site of the main branch of the University of Wisconsin
University of Wisconsin - a university in Madison, Wisconsin
Badger State, WI, Wisconsin - a midwestern state in north central United States
References in classic literature ?
On his bench in Madison Square Soapy moved uneasily.
Jack is kind to the regular denizens of Madison Square, and gives fair warning of his annual call.
He set his face down this toward Madison Square, for the homing instinct survives even when the home is a park bench.
This address at Madison was the first that I had delivered that in any large measure dealt with the general problem of the races.
In this address at Madison I took the ground that the policy to be pursued with references to the races was, by every honourable means, to bring them together and to encourage the cultivation of friendly relations, instead of doing that which would embitter.
The address which I delivered at Madison, before the National Educational Association, gave me a rather wide introduction in the North, and soon after that opportunities began offering themselves for me to address audiences there.
He had been to Lake Winnipeg, where he received an express from Canada, containing the declaration of war, and President Madison's proclamation, which he handed with the most officious complaisance to Messrs.
"I'm generally so tied down; but I met the Countess Ellen in Madison Square, and she was good enough to let me walk home with her."
The grandfathers of 1876 were fond of telling how Webster opposed taking Texas and Oregon into the Union; how George Washington advised against including the Mississippi River; and how Monroe warned Congress that a country that reached from the Atlantic to the Middle West was "too extensive to be governed but by a despotic monarchy." They told how Abraham Lincoln, when he was postmaster of New Salem, used to carry the letters in his coon- skin cap and deliver them at sight; how in 1822 the mails were carried on horseback and not in stages, so as to have the quickest possible service; and how the news of Madison's election was three weeks in reaching the people of Kentucky.
Madison did not realize as he positioned himself in the front of the room in Independence Hall on that late May day that what he then undertook to create would be "Madisons Notes" any more than, say, William Marbury knew in filing for a writ of mandamus against Secretary of State Madison that he was initiating the famous Marbury v.
James Madison and the Future of Limited Government is, however, neither biography nor study; rather, it is a debater's handbook.
James Madison: A Life Reconsidered, Lynne Cheney, Viking, 576 pages.