madrigal

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mad·ri·gal

 (măd′rĭ-gəl)
n.
1.
a. A song for two or three unaccompanied voices, developed in Italy in the late 1200s and early 1300s.
b. A short poem, often about love, suitable for being set to music.
2.
a. A polyphonic song using a vernacular text and written for four to six voices, developed in Italy in the 16th century and popular in England in the 1500s and early 1600s.
b. A part song.

[Italian madrigale, probably from dialectal madregal, simple, from Late Latin mātrīcālis, invented, original, from Latin, of the womb, from mātrīx, mātrīc-, womb, from māter, mātr-, mother; see mater.]

mad′ri·gal·ist n.

madrigal

(ˈmædrɪɡəl)
n
1. (Classical Music) music a type of 16th- or 17th-century part song for unaccompanied voices with an amatory or pastoral text. Compare glee2
2. (Classical Music) a 14th-century Italian song, related to a pastoral stanzaic verse form
[C16: from Italian, from Medieval Latin mātricāle primitive, apparently from Latin mātrīcālis of the womb, from matrīx womb]
ˈmadrigalˌesque adj
madrigalian adj
ˈmadrigalist n

mad•ri•gal

(ˈmæd rɪ gəl)

n.
1. an unaccompanied polyphonic secular vocal composition, esp. of the 16th and 17th centuries.
2. part song; glee.
3. a short lyric poem of medieval times.
[1580–90; < Italian madrigale < Medieval Latin mātricāle something simple]
mad′ri•gal•ist, n.

madrigal

1. a part song for several voices making much use of contrapuntal imitation.
2. a lyric poem suitable for setting to music, usually with love as a theme. — madrigalist, n.
See also: Songs and Singing
a lyric poem suitable for setting to music, usually with love as a theme. — madrigalist, n.
See also: Verse

madrigal

An unaccompanied song for several voices.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.madrigal - an unaccompanied partsong for 2 or 3 voicesmadrigal - an unaccompanied partsong for 2 or 3 voices; follows a strict poetic form
partsong - a song with two or more voice parts
Verb1.madrigal - sing madrigalsmadrigal - sing madrigals; "The group was madrigaling beautifully"
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
sing - deliver by singing; "Sing Christmas carols"
Translations
قَصيدَه غَزَلِيَّه
madrigal
madrigal
madrigál
madrígal
madrigalas
madrigāls
madrigal
çalgısız söylenen şarkımadrigal

madrigal

[ˈmædrɪgəl] Nmadrigal m

madrigal

nMadrigal nt

madrigal

[ˈmædrɪgl] nmadrigale m

madrigal

(ˈmӕdrigəl) noun
a type of song for several voices singing unaccompanied in harmony.
References in periodicals archive ?
What Handel achieved in Messiah was a wonderful blend of elegant, Italianate melody alternating with virtuosic vocalism for the soloists and, for the chorus, unmatched choral sonorities ranging from madrigalesque lightness to the composer's characteristic ceremonial style.
The madrigalesque Come, woeful Orpheus manages three.
Madrigalesque poetry in the 16th century consisted of a single stanza of seven or eleven syllable lines arranged in a free order, with no set rhyme scheme.