magazinist

magazinist

(ˌmæɡəˈziːnɪst)
n
(Journalism & Publishing) a magazine editor or writer
References in periodicals archive ?
In the sequel, she chronicles her life as a professional writer and magazinist during and after Shanghai's "lonely island" period (1937-45) in the midst of Japanese occupation of eastern China.
Formado pelos gostos da classe media, leitora dos meios de circulacao em massa, o magazinist bem-sucedido, equivalente a Nathaniel Parker Willis, devia transformar-se, com igual facilidade, em contista, ensaista, paragraphist (redator de pequenas noticias) e poeta, explicou Auerbach (1989), evocando o memoravel estudo de Walter Benjamin (1936).
They were, as little magazinist Gelett Burgess noted, a medium of "personal expression" (19 emphasis added).
Expressing a rare critique, one British magazinist, while finding Retzsch's Mephistopheles 'worthy the phantom creation of Goethe', nevertheless observed that Retzsch was generally 'too profuse' in the 'introduction of phantoms and demons'.
They also situate his critical pieces appearing in periodicals in the context of the new role of 'magazinist.' This collection was originally planned to be part of Burton Pollin's continuing edition of The Collected Writings of Edgar Allen Poe.
"The Uncollected Stories of Virginia Frazer Boyle, Victorian Magazinist." Victorian Periodicals Review 28:3 (1995): 249-63.
Calverton, a Radical Magazinist For Black Intellectuals, 1920-1940." Journal of Negro History 57 (1972): 214-53.
Instead, "The essential difference is not one of aesthetics or of some subtler metaphysical nature, but of the two writers' antithetical social and economic positions." Poe was a popular, market-driven writer, a "magazinist," while Eliot was supported by a high culture with subtle, indirect patronage.
De Bow: Magazinist of the Old South (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1958); Miles quoted in Charles J.
magazines; they were magazinists. They wrote for all kinds of magazines
At the same time, the variety of fields in which authors could participate increased dramatically during the last part of the 18th century and the whole 19th century: newspapers and journalism, political campaigns, literature both for the masses as for the elites, treatises, intellectual societies, magazinists, and reviewers.
En una conferencia pronunciada en 1988, Daniel Aaron hace una breve historia de como se crea en Estados Unidos una literatura nacional: "It could be said that for a long time, there was a kind of unofficial canon, created but not necessarily defined or sustained by publishers or magazinists" (1988: 44).