magian


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ma·gus

 (mā′gəs)
n. pl. ma·gi (mā′jī′)
1. A member of the Zoroastrian priestly caste of the Medes and Persians.
2. Magus In the New Testament, one of the wise men from the East, traditionally held to be three, who traveled to Bethlehem to pay homage to the infant Jesus.
3. A sorcerer; a magician.

[From Middle English magi, magi, from Latin magī, pl. of magus, sorcerer, magus, from Greek magos, from Old Persian maguš; see magh- in Indo-European roots.]

ma′gi·an (mā′jē-ən) adj.
mage, magian - Mage and magian are two other ways to say magician.
See also related terms for magician.
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References in classic literature ?
In the Hindu, Egyptian, or Romanesque architecture, one feels the priest, nothing but the priest, whether he calls himself Brahmin, Magian, or Pope.
The most credible pictures are those of majestic men who prevailed at their entrance, and convinced the senses; as happened to the eastern magian who was sent to test the merits of Zertusht or Zoroaster.
The priestcraft of the East and West, of the Magian, Brahmin, Druid, and Inca, is expounded in the individual's private life.
The Holy Prophet PBUH is reported to have said that every child is born into the fold of Islam, and it is his parents who transform him into a Christian, Jew or Magian. The Prophet PBUH said: 'Of all that a father can give to his children, the best is their good education and training'.
Then his parents make him a Jew, a Christian or a Magian, just as an animal is born intact.
Sal.) to live by the Caspian Sea and their religion is given as Magian. The meaning of the name itself is given as "those left behind" (turki ertinya ketinggalan), the explanation given being that they are the descendants of men who found themselves on the wrong side of the wall that Alexander built to shut out the tribes of Gog and Magog; Bost.
The Magian culture of the Middle East, while struggling with internal and external threats and challenges, is fiercely protective of its lands and cultural identity.
Why wine is integral to Persian culture What would Persian poetry be without Khayyam's drunken verses and Hafez's Magian wine?
They made unlawful to people that which I had made lawful for them, and they commanded them to associate in worship with Me, that which I had sent down no authority." The Prophet (peace be upon him) said: "Every child is born upon the Fitrah (Muslim/Ahmad) but his parents make him a Jew or a Christian or a magian. It is like the way an animal gives birth to a natural offspring.
Abdelrahman Munif, ( A Magian Love Story ) , Beirut: al-Mux-assasah al-x[c]Araby1/2yah lil-Diryusyut wa-al-Nashr, 1974.
The cameo with Asclepius (probably accompanied by his daughter Hygeia, goddess of health) is described in an inventory as "Uno chammeo grande leghato in oro chon dua figure intagliate di mezzo rilievo, un maschio e una femina, chon un albero in mezo che hanno a pie 2 serpe ..."; see Darrell Davisson, "Magian Ars medica: Liturgical Devices and Eastern Influences in the Medici Palace Chapel," Studies in Iconography 22 (2001): 162.
33) Constance Garnett (1861-1946): emphasized the crucial importance of a language nationally and individually, reminding us of Oswald Spengler (1919, 1922) and his cultural discourse based on an indepth exploration of the "souls" (the Egyptian, the Classical, the Euclidean Classical, the Stoic, the Western, the Gothic, the Arabian, the Indian, the Brahmanic Indian, the Babylonian, the Chinese, the Appolinian, the Faustian, the Magian, etc.) of cultures and civilizations, all of which may have a common ground in an "ahistoric soul" of universal humanity: