magic bullet

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magic bullet

n. Slang
Something regarded as a magical solution or cure: "There is no magic bullet against cancer" (Matt Clark).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

magic bullet

n
(Medicine) informal any therapeutic agent, esp one in the early stages of development, reputed to be very effective in treating a condition, such as a malignant tumour, by specifically targeting the diseased tissue
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mag′ic bul′let


n.
something that cures or remedies by attacking a specific disease without causing harmful side effects.
[1935–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.magic bullet - a remedy (drug or therapy or preventive) that cures or prevents a diseasemagic bullet - a remedy (drug or therapy or preventive) that cures or prevents a disease; "there is no magic bullet against cancer"
drug - a substance that is used as a medicine or narcotic
curative, cure, therapeutic, remedy - a medicine or therapy that cures disease or relieve pain
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the last century they were called magic bullets.
Formula One champions Mercedes have no "magic bullets" to solve the problems that slowed Lewis Hamilton in Russia last month, but they are focusing on finding a solution, team boss Toto Wolff said.
Essentially, magic bullets are arrogant boasters, announcing, "We will do it all for you." They refuse to believe that the user might not want exactly what their search algorithms offer.
The group's latest work, Magic Bullets, which premieres at the Incubator Arts Project May 2--11, takes on health and wellness in America.
We often hear "There are no magic bullets.'" I beg to differ.
Rather than seeking to find magic bullets, chemicals that specifically attack one gene or protein involved in one particular part of a disease process, the new approach looks to find "magic shotguns" by sifting through the known universe of chemicals to find the few special molecules that broadly disrupt the whole diseases process.
In politics--as in real life--there are no magic bullets. Solutions often come draped in as many complications as the problems they seek to address.
A century ago, the German Nobel laureate Paul Ehrlich introduced the concept of "magic bullets" -- compounds engineered to target and kill tumor cells or disease-causing organisms without affecting normal cells.
Professor Colin Self, one of the scientists conducting the research at the University of Newcastle, said: "I would describe this development as the equivalent of ultra-specific magic bullets."
And expensive cholesterol-lowering statin drugs are not magic bullets: they lower the risk of a heart attack or stroke by only about 25 percent.
Everybody loves a magic bullet, but in science, magic bullets just don't work" he says.
For years insurers have been advised of the magic bullets that will kill these demons, and technology has advanced to the stage where upgrading information technology systems is inevitable and most of the major players have updated as many systems as feasible.