magnanimously


Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to magnanimously: quarrelsome, ostentatious

mag·nan·i·mous

 (măg-năn′ə-məs)
adj.
Highly moral, especially in showing kindness or forgiveness, as in overlooking insults or not seeking revenge.

[From Latin magnanimus : magnus, great; see meg- in Indo-European roots + animus, soul, mind; see anə- in Indo-European roots.]

mag·nan′i·mous·ly adv.
mag·nan′i·mous·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.magnanimously - in a magnanimous mannermagnanimously - in a magnanimous manner; "magnanimously, he forgave all those who had harmed him"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
بِشَهامَه، بِنَخْوَه
velkodušně
storsindet
göfuglega, göfugmannlega
veľkodušne
cömertçe

magnanimously

[mægˈnænɪməslɪ] ADV (gen) → magnánimamente; [say] → con magnanimidad, magnánimamente
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

magnanimously

[mægˈnænɪməsli] advmagnanimement
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

magnanimously

advgroßmütig; (= generously)großzügig
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

magnanimously

[mægˈnænɪməslɪ] advcon magnanimità, magnanimamente
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

magnanimous

(mӕgˈnӕniməs) adjective
noble and generous. a magnanimous gesture.
magˈnanimously adverb
magnanimity (mӕgnəˈniməti) noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
"Then you may admire Leslie's all you like," said Anne magnanimously.
And me to go magnanimously to forgive her, and have pity on her!
Although he was utterly unable to stand erect or to navigate his body across the deck, he still magnanimously proffered his services to pilot the ship to a good and secure anchorage.
"They are better women than I," she replied, magnanimously sticking to her resolve.
Then he imagined how, after the attack, Bogdanich would come up to him as he lay wounded and would magnanimously extend the hand of reconciliation.
"I think it would be well for you just to go and see her before Lydgate comes," said Sir James, magnanimously. "Only don't stay long."
Not a half-penny to me!" he cried magnanimously, in his brassiest tones.
Magnanimously releasing the defeated, just in time to get his gloves into a drawer and feign to be looking out of window in a contemplative state of mind when a servant entered, the Reverend Septimus then gave place to the urn and other preparations for breakfast.
The young man had tact enough to discover that he had an advantage, and fearful that some one might come in and interrupt the tete a tete, he magnanimously resolved to throw all on a single cast, and come to the point at once.
A slight haze still lingered in the air after the storm, for Fanny was very humble and tender that evening; Tom a trifle pensive, but distressingly polite, and Polly magnanimously friendly to every one; for generous natures like to forgive, and Polly enjoyed the petting after the insult, like a very human girl.
There lies on his desk at this present moment, ready for transmission to you, a letter, in which he tells you that our poverty--our poverty; his and mine, Miss Haredale-- forbids him to pursue his claim upon your hand; in which he offers, voluntarily proposes, to free you from your pledge; and talks magnanimously (men do so, very commonly, in such cases) of being in time more worthy of your regard--and so forth.
Upon this, the parish authorities magnanimously and humanely resolved, that Oliver should be 'farmed,' or, in other words, that he should be dispatched to a branch-workhouse some three miles off, where twenty or thirty other juvenile offenders against the poor-laws, rolled about the floor all day, without the inconvenience of too much food or too much clothing, under the parental superintendence of an elderly female, who received the culprits at and for the consideration of sevenpence-halfpenny per small head per week.