magnes


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magnes

(ˈmæɡniːz)
n
(Chemistry) a magnetic iron ore. Archaic form: magnesstone
References in classic literature ?
The claim to Comedy is put forward by the Megarians,--not only by those of Greece proper, who allege that it originated under their democracy, but also by the Megarians of Sicily, for the poet Epicharmus, who is much earlier than Chionides and Magnes, belonged to that country.
From the daughters of Deucalion sprang Magnes and Macedon, ancestors of the Magnesians and Macedonians, who are thus represented as cousins to the true Hellenic stock.
Magnes: An American Jewish Nonconformist, by Daniel P.
Yehuda Leib Magnes deserves a biography due to his rich activity in the Jewish and Zionist public spheres.
Magnes Museum becomes the Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life at the Bancroft Library.
Magnes. Born in California in 1877, he grew up in an Orthodox home but culturally American.
Several restaurants and bars have come and gone in that space in the past few years, but Plan B Saloon harks back to The Factory, said co-owner Moses Magnes. The Factory occupied the same space up until 2005, when it closed after the owner died.
"We were all fans of The Factory," Magnes said, adding that he hopes to create the same laid-back atmosphere he remembers from The Factory.
Edwards University in Austin, Texas, Carmella Magnes has one of the most distinctive titles in higher ed today.
Before building a campaign, Magnes works closely with her internal "clients" to determine their expectations: "Are they looking for lead generations, such as people filling out forms that require specific information?
The roots of the opposition to the Jewish state date back to the early years of the twentieth century, and can be found in the ideas of left-wing Jewish intellectuals of Brit Shalom ("The Peace Association")--and later of Ihud ("The Union Association," which advocated political union between Jews and Arabs)--during the pre-state period, including leading figures at the Hebrew University such as Judah Magnes and Martin Buber.
In retrospect, they appear as prologues announcing the themes and introducing the protagonists of Judah Magnes' embattled incumbency as first chancellor of the Hebrew University - from 1925 when he was elected to the position soon after the official opening of the University, until 1935 when the office was abolished and he was given the honorary title of President.