magnetic bubble


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magnetic bubble

n
(General Physics) physics a small round magnetic domain induced by a magnetic field in a thin film of magnetic material, used in certain types of computer memories

magnet′ic bub′ble


n.
a tiny mobile magnetized area within a magnetic material, the basis of one type of solid-state computer storage medium (magnet′ic bub′ble mem`ory).
[1965–1970]
References in periodicals archive ?
TEHRAN (FNA)- A team of researchers discovered that a common space weather phenomenon on the outskirts of Earth's magnetic bubble, the magnetosphere, has much larger repercussions for Venus.
Intuitively, we define the magnetic bubble in terms of the sensitivity of the receiver [6].
21 ( ANI ): Researchers have discovered that a common space weather phenomenon on the outskirts of Earth's magnetic bubble, the magnetosphere, has much larger repercussions for Venus.
The Compass featured an Intel 8086 processor, a 340-kilobyte magnetic bubble memory, and a 1,200 bit/s modem.
Wolverton then extracts a major lesson in breakthrough innovation, relating how Boyle and Smith had been working on one new technology when their boss, Jack Morton, who headed advanced research, challenged them to come up with something that would compete with the magnetic bubble technology other departments were eagerly researching.
His most famous invention was the creation of Magnetic Bubble Devices which revolutionized electronic and solid state physics information.
The craft also examined Mercury's magnetosphere, the vast magnetic bubble surrounding both the planet and exosphere.
The boundary of the protective magnetic bubble around Earth moves, exposing geosynchronous satellites to the direct impact of the CME; and particles trapped in the Van Allen belts become accelerated to higher energies, blasting satellites with ionizing particles that can short out on-board computers or damage sensitive instruments.
Earths magnetic bubble the magnetosphere protects the planet from high-energy radiation coming from the Sun and interstellar space, but during particularly strong solar events, particles can slip through.
On the planet's sunward side, this magnetic bubble typically extends to distances of 3V2 to 7 million km--50 to 100 times Jupiter's radius.
Heliophysicists studying how near-Earth space is affected by radiation and magnetic energy from the sun also have observed soft X-rays from the outer boundaries of Earth's magnetosphere, the magnetic bubble that shields Earth from hazardous solar storms.