magnetic compass

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magnetic compass

n.
An instrument that uses a magnetized steel bar to indicate direction relative to the earth's magnetic poles.

magnetic compass

n
(General Physics) a compass containing a magnetic needle pivoted in a horizontal plane, that indicates the direction of magnetic north at points on the earth's surface

magnetic compass

An instrument containing a freely suspended magnetic element which displays the direction of the horizontal component of the Earth's magnetic field at the point of observation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.magnetic compass - compass based on an indicator (as a magnetic needle) that points to the magnetic northmagnetic compass - compass based on an indicator (as a magnetic needle) that points to the magnetic north
compass - navigational instrument for finding directions
compass card, mariner's compass - compass in the form of a card that rotates so that 0 degrees or North points to magnetic north
magnetic needle - a slender magnet suspended in a magnetic compass on a mounting with little friction; used to indicate the direction of the earth's magnetic pole
Translations
方位磁針
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract notice: Procurement of magnetic Compasses and Clinometers.
Because of the remoteness of the region, magnetic compasses don't function properly; because of patchy satellite coverage, GPS coverage is spotty.
They suggest that experiments in labs all over the world may have missed finding animals' magnetic compasses because background electromagnetic noise interfered.
One of the main advantages of gyrocompasses over traditional magnetic compasses is that they locate the true north rather than the magnetic north - very important in navigation.
Because the two norths line up in the Bermuda Triangle, magnetic compasses go crazy when they're used in this area.
For 1500, the relevant advances included firearms, ships capable of crossing oceans, magnetic compasses, movable-block printing, steel, and plows.
John Lilley and Gillie, which can trace its origins to 1812, makes ships' instruments, including magnetic compasses, and also sells a range of 3,500 Admiralty Charts, which map sea depths, coastlines, land and underwater contour lines.
They tested the hypothesis that bats do as birds do and calibrate their magnetic compasses - which use the Earth's magnetic field to navigate-to the sun.