magnetic poles


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magnetic poles

Points on the Earth’s surface sought by a magnetic compass needle. Their positions vary.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
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References in classic literature ?
Low-flying planes often "glue up" when near the Magnetic Pole, and there is no reason in science why the same disability should not be experienced at higher levels when the Auroras are "delivering" strongly.
Indeed, at the distance they were from the earth, the magnetic pole could have no perceptible action upon the apparatus; but the box placed on the lunar disc might perhaps exhibit some strange phenomena.
I afterward learned that the shaft rests directly over the magnetic pole of Mars, but whether this adds in any way to its incalculable power of attraction I do not know.
The worry is that this sort of behaviour by the magnetic pole may be signalling an impending 'flip' in which the north and south magnetic poles change places.
If you were actually standing at the geographic north or south pole, your compass would still point towards the magnetic poles.
For this reason, the planet's magnetic poles don't align exactly with its geographic ones (which are simply the end points of the Earth's rotation axis), and the location of the poles can change without warning.
The invisible force field around the planet that provides a shield from cosmic radiation and harsh solar winds, is weakening so rapidly that scientists believe it could even cause a reversal of Earth's magnetic poles. The Earth's magnetic field flipped nearly 800,000 years ago.
The system focuses on the boundary region between atoms whose magnetic poles are pointing in one direction and those with poles pointing the other way.
Also, the Earth's magnetic field acts like a funnel to pour the charged particles from the cosmic rays onto the magnetic poles, and it is these charged particles hitting the Earth's atmosphere that causes the auroras.
Both entertaining and educational, this book begins with a description of the mysterious and eerie lights that sometimes undulate across the night sky near the earth's magnetic poles. Though our ancestors all had mythic explanations for the aurora, science can help us understand how a magnetic storm on the sun blows off plasma particles that race outwards and, a few days later, interact with the magnetic field of our planet.
One is its geographic location; the donut-like shape of Earth's magnetic field pushes the energy and material ejected from the sun toward the magnetic poles, where its interaction with the magnetic field causes the formation of auroras and electrical surges.