magnetic reversal


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magnetic reversal

n.
1. A change in the polarity of a magnetic field in which magnetic north and south are reversed.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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"They claim a relationship between the rotation and the magnetic polarity of Earth, which does change irregularly, with a magnetic reversal taking place every 400,000 years on average.
But there's much more to consider, not least that north and south are prone to switching at any moment, known as a 'magnetic reversal'.
Despite sensationalized media reports that our home planet could be heading for a magnetic reversal "soon," researchers have no such short-term concerns.
As is known, the value of the magnetic losses is proportional to the frequency of magnetic reversal, and the value of the electric losses is proportional to the square of the current.
There is a magnetic reversal recorded in the rocks within the lower crust at Atlantis Bank.
In addition, by utilizing this technology, Fujitsu conducted large-scale simulations to clarify the correlation between the fine structure of neodymium magnets(4), a type of permanent magnet, and magnetic strength, by examining the process of magnetic reversal in neodymium magnets.
magnetic reversal EVERY few hundred thousand years the planet's magnetic field dwindles away then, over the next century, reappears with north and south poles flipped.
Three-dimensional modeling of a magnetic reversal boundary from inversion of deep-tow measurements.
NASA also provided more concrete details on the impact of the sun's magnetic reversal. Phillips noted that the polarity changes may be felt to the Voyager probes.
Critical fields of magnetic reversal (11)-(16) depend essentially on the elongation q and the relative volume of one of the [epsilon] particle's phases.
What's interesting about Bagby's lunar cycle, though, is that it is almost exactly one-fifth the complete sunspot cycle of 22.1 years, the average time in which our sun undergoes a magnetic reversal and returns to its original polarity.

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