magnetic storm

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magnetic storm

n.
A disturbance or fluctuation in the earth's magnetic field, associated with solar flares. Also called geomagnetic storm.

magnetic storm

n
(Physical Geography) a sudden severe disturbance of the earth's magnetic field, caused by emission of charged particles from the sun

magnet′ic storm′


n.
a disturbance of the earth's magnetic field induced by radiation and streams of charged particles from the sun.

magnetic storm

A disturbance or fluctuation in the Earth's magnetic field, caused by streams of charged particles given off by solar flares.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.magnetic storm - a sudden disturbance of the earth's magnetic fieldmagnetic storm - a sudden disturbance of the earth's magnetic field; caused by emission of particles from the sun
disturbance, perturbation - activity that is a malfunction, intrusion, or interruption; "the term `distress' connotes some degree of perturbation and emotional upset"; "he looked around for the source of the disturbance"; "there was a disturbance of neural function"
References in periodicals archive ?
"If superflares occur on the Sun, they generate large plasma ejections, and if such ejections collide with Earth, very large magnetic storms are caused; large geomagnetic storms are results of superflares." Notsu explained that superflares are considerably bigger in terms of their energy expenditure, with blasts being hundreds to thousands of times more powerful than anything observed on the Sun.
Complicating the matter was the fact that STEVE can appear during solar-induced magnetic storms around Earth that power the brightest auroral lights.
The solar wind is prone to outbursts that can lead to magnetic storms and bright auroras at Earth, as well as varying strongly over the 11-year solar cycle, and with distance from the Sun.
Typical signals are from our Sun and the Jupiter/Io magnetic storms but also include deep-space emissions from other celestial bodies and phenomena.
Tsurutani, "Criteria of interplanetary parameters causing intense magnetic storms (Dst < -100 nT)," Planetary and Space Science, vol.
It caused one of the strongest magnetic storms in the observation history - the 4th degree.
Further views of aurora phenomena are presented in Skirnir's Journey (Norse) about views from outer space, the Valkyries (Norse), Eos' Wish (Greek) about forecasting auroras, the Rainbow Belt (Wabanaki/Algonquin) about environmental effects, and the Land of Eternal Memory (Mi'kmaq/French Canadian), about magnetic storms. "Stories of the Auroras" closes with tips and facts about where and when to search for auroras, and the final chapter recaps the theme of enjoying the aurora through facts and fiction, which showcases both the marvelous auroras themselves and human wonder at their marvelous existence.
Generally, there are more magnetic storms around the equinoxes March to April and September to October."
The natural sources entail the phenomenon such as dust storms, magnetic storms, hurricanes, volcanic ash, forest and prairie fires can emit large quantities of pollutants'; the vegetation naturally emit VOCs which are oxidized and form aerosols that can cause a blue haze; and dust storms can create large amounts of particulate matter.
A question naturally arising is whether the analyzed parameters were observables of a process taking place in the Earth's crust system or any other process that could influence magnetic field variations such as magnetic storms. In Fig.
Luhmann said that by studying images captured by the sun-observing spacecraft, scientists can better understand coronal mass ejections and predict solar magnetic storms in the future.
Diagrams presenting magnetic storms for three days are also available.