magnetic variation


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Related to magnetic variation: Magnetic deviation

magnetic variation

n.
1. Differences in the earth's magnetic field in time and location.

magnetic variation

n
(General Physics) another name for magnetic declination

magnetic variation

1. In navigation, at a given place and time, the horizontal angle between the true north and magnetic north measured east or west according to whether magnetic north lies east or west of true north. See also magnetic declination.
2. In cartography, the annual change in direction of the horizontal component of the Earth's magnetic field.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.magnetic variation - the angle (at a particular location) between magnetic north and true northmagnetic variation - the angle (at a particular location) between magnetic north and true north
angle - the space between two lines or planes that intersect; the inclination of one line to another; measured in degrees or radians
References in classic literature ?
There is a good stone prison here; and there are, besides, a handsome church, a court-house, public offices, many commodious private residences, and a government observatory for noting and recording the magnetic variations. In the College of Upper Canada, which is one of the public establishments of the city, a sound education in every department of polite learning can be had, at a very moderate expense: the annual charge for the instruction of each pupil, not exceeding nine pounds sterling.
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the National Geodetic Survey study these shifts in magnetic variation and publish the changing values every five years.
- magnetic variation of same latitude and longitude
Jeppesen says that due to an "oversight" on its part, the database did not include a dynamic magnetic variation adjustment for terminal and en route waypoints, an error that could cause the system to calculate erroneous courses and bearings.
The next field is the magnetic variation in degrees in the range 000.0 to 180.0 degrees; this variation quantifies the difference between "true north" and the "magnetic north" indicated by a compass.
Which is where this handy guide comes in, covering everything from how scale works to the difference between a spot height and a trig pillar to what magnetic variation is, and how to allow for it when using a compass (keep your elbows tucked in).
She comments on Garzoni's distrust of magnetic variation data gathered by sailors and navigators, but does not draw more general connections to early modern attitudes towards craft knowledge or discussions of the value and limitations of experimental and experiential knowledge.