magnetism


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mag·net·ism

 (măg′nĭ-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. The class of phenomena exhibited by a magnetic field.
2. The study of magnets and their effects.
3. The force exerted by a magnetic field.
4. Unusual power to attract, fascinate, or influence: the magnetism of money.
5. Animal magnetism.

magnetism

(ˈmæɡnɪˌtɪzəm)
n
1. (General Physics) the property of attraction displayed by magnets
2. (General Physics) any of a class of phenomena in which a field of force is caused by a moving electric charge. See also electromagnetism, ferromagnetism, diamagnetism, paramagnetism
3. (General Physics) the branch of physics concerned with magnetic phenomena
4. powerful attraction
ˈmagnetist n

mag•net•ism

(ˈmæg nɪˌtɪz əm)

n.
1. the properties of attraction or molecular properties possessed by magnets.
2. the agency producing magnetic phenomena.
3. the science dealing with magnetic phenomena.
4. strong attractive power or charm.
[1610–20]

mag·net·ism

(măg′nĭ-tĭz′əm)
1. The force produced by a magnetic field.
2. The properties or effects of magnets: Magnetism causes a compass needle to point north.
Did You Know? The force known as magnetism is caused by the motion of electrons. As these tiny, negatively charged particles revolve around an atomic nucleus, they create an electric current that produces a magnetic field. This invisible field is made up of closed loops called lines of force that surround and run through the atom like tiny raceways. The places where these lines of force come together are strongly magnetic and are called north and south poles. In some substances, these tiny magnetic fields naturally align, and the entire substance acts like a magnet—with north and south poles and a magnetic field. These naturally magnetic substances are called permanent magnets. Other things, such as a coil of wire, can be made magnetic by running electric current through them. These electrically produced magnets, called electromagnets, are used in many devices, such as the one that translates electric signals into the voice you hear on the telephone.

magnetism

Forces of attraction and repulsion associated with magnets.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.magnetism - attraction for ironmagnetism - attraction for iron; associated with electric currents as well as magnets; characterized by fields of force
attraction, attractive force - the force by which one object attracts another
electromagnetism - magnetism produced by an electric current; "electromagnetism was discovered when it was observed that a copper wire carrying an electric current can magnetize pieces of iron or steel near it"
antiferromagnetism - magnetic field creates parallel but opposing spins; varies with temperature
diamagnetism - phenomenon exhibited by materials like copper or bismuth that become magnetized in a magnetic field with a polarity opposite to the magnetic force; unlike iron they are slightly repelled by a magnet
ferromagnetism - phenomenon exhibited by materials like iron (nickel or cobalt) that become magnetized in a magnetic field and retain their magnetism when the field is removed
paramagnetism - materials like aluminum or platinum become magnetized in a magnetic field but it disappears when the field is removed
2.magnetism - the branch of science that studies magnetismmagnetism - the branch of science that studies magnetism
geophysical science, geophysics - geology that uses physical principles to study properties of the earth

magnetism

noun charm, appeal, attraction, power, draw, pull, spell, magic, fascination, charisma, attractiveness, allure, enchantment, hypnotism, drawing power, seductiveness, mesmerism, captivatingness There was no doubting the animal magnetism of the man.

magnetism

noun
2. The capacity to exert an influence:
Translations
جاذِبِيَّهمغناطيسيَّة الأرض، جاذِبِيَّة الأرْض
magnetismuspřitažlivost
magnetismetiltrækningskraft
magnetismi
magnetizam
mágneses erő
persónutöfrarsegulfræîi
magnetizmus
magnetism
cazibeçekicilikmanyetizmamıknatıslık

magnetism

[ˈmægnɪtɪzəm] Nmagnetismo m (fig) → magnetismo m, atractivo m

magnetism

[ˈmægnɪtɪzəm] n
(lit)magnétisme m
(fig) (= attraction) [person, place] → magnétisme m animal magnetismmagnet school n (US) école en zone d'éducation prioritaire

magnetism

nMagnetismus m; (fig: of person) → Anziehungskraft f, → Ausstrahlung f

magnetism

[ˈmægnɪˌtɪzm] nmagnetismo

magnet

(ˈmӕgnit) noun
a piece of iron, or of certain other materials, that attracts or repels other pieces of iron etc.
magˈnetic (-ˈne-) adjective
1. of, or having the powers of, or operating by means of, a magnet or magnetism. magnetic force.
2. strongly attractive. a magnetic personality.
magˈnetically adverb
ˈmagnetism noun
1. power of attraction. his personal magnetism.
2. (the science of) magnets and their power of attraction. the magnetism of the earth.
ˈmagnetize, ˈmagnetise verb
1. to make magnetic. You can magnetize a piece of iron.
2. to attract or influence strongly. She's the kind of person who can magnetize others.
magnetic field
the area in which the pull of a magnet, or thing acting like a magnet, is felt. the earth's magnetic field.
magnetic north
the direction, either east or west of the true north, in which a magnetized needle points.

mag·ne·tism

n. magnetismo, propiedad de atracción y repulsión magnéticas.
References in classic literature ?
They now went below stairs, where Phoebe--not so much assuming the office as attracting it to herself, by the magnetism of innate fitness--took the most active part in preparing breakfast.
If the minister's voice had not kept her there, there would, nevertheless, have been an inevitable magnetism in that spot, whence she dated the first hour of her life of ignominy.
But as ever before, the pagan harpooneers remained almost wholly unimpressed; or if impressed, it was only with a certain magnetism shot into their congenial hearts from inflexible Ahab's.
I believe that there is a subtle magnetism in Nature, which, if we unconsciously yield to it, will direct us aright.
Burch; "with her voice, and her magnetism, and her gift of language.
Meanwhile too I had made the acquaintance of the charming lady Obstacle,--as it proved so unfair to call her,--and by some process of natural magnetism we had immediately won each other's hearts, so that on the moonlight night on which I took the river path with my brown-paper parcel there was no misgiving in my heart,--nothing but harping and singing, and blessings on the river that seemed all silver with the backs of magic trout.
The whole crowd seemed to swing round in the direction of the glint of fire, and I too was swung round by the magnetism of the movement.
It is magnetism, she says, and when she dreams a thing it is sure to happen, she assures me.
A better-constituted boy would certainly have profited under my intelligent tutors, with their scientific apparatus; and would, doubtless, have found the phenomena of electricity and magnetism as fascinating as I was, every Thursday, assured they were.
As I told you, it has imbibed a spiritual essence--call it magnetism, or what you will.
Here our whole party, joining voices, detailed, at great length, the assumptions of phrenology and the marvels of animal magnetism.
She realized, too, how ironical it was that with all her work she should have grown to be so ungainly although Martin retained the old magnetism of his gorgeous physique.