magnetoelectric


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mag·ne·to·e·lec·tric

 (măg-nē′tō-ĭ-lĕk′trĭk)
adj.
Of or relating to electricity produced by magnetic means.

mag·ne′to·e·lec·tric′i·ty (-ĭ-lĕk-trĭs′ĭ-tē, -ē′lĕk-) n.

mag•ne•to•e•lec•tric

(mægˌni toʊ ɪˈlɛk trɪk)

also mag•ne`to•e•lec′tri•cal,



adj.
of or pertaining to the induction of electric current or electromotive force by means of permanent magnets.
[1831 (Faraday)]
mag•ne`to•e•lec•tric′i•ty (-ɪ lɛkˈtrɪs ɪ ti, -ˌi lɛk-) n.
References in periodicals archive ?
This coupling allows substantially intriguing physical phenomena and magnetoelectric functionalities which can potentially be exploited not only in the construction of novel and multifunctional spintronic devices.
Wu, Magnetization, Magnetoelectric Effect, and Structure Transition in BiFeO3 and (Bi0.95La0.05) FeO3 Multiferroic Ceramics, IEEE Trans.
Depending on magnetic and electric characteristics of B and B' it is relatively easy to create new perovskite systems with half-metallic properties (Erten, et al., 2011), magnetoelectric response (Molegraaf, et al., 2009) or magnetic ordering (Lee & Marianetti, 2018), which offer promissory perspectives in the new field of spintronics technology (Pilo, et al., 2017).
Ozbay, "Diodelike asymmetric transmission of linearly polarized waves using magnetoelectric coupling and electromagnetic wave tunneling," Phys.
(vi) a magnetoelectric amperemeter and a magnetoelectric voltmeter
Yin, "A dual-wideband double-layer magnetoelectric dipole antenna with a modified horned reflector for 2G/3G/LTE applications," International Journal of Antennas and Propagation, vol.
The magnetoelectric effects found in magnetic oxides have recently found numerous applications in biology, medicine, and biotechnology [8].
(1) Magneto-electric speed measurement: based on the law of electromagnetic induction [6], the measurement can be implemented by using a magnetoelectric speed sensor that is placed on the shell of the turbine section (when it is in a static state).
Bismuth ferrite (BiFe[O.sub.3]) is today a well-known single-phase magnetoelectric material that combines room temperature ferroelectricity and antiferromagnetic ordering and as such, has attracted a considerable amount of attention due to its multiferroic properties [1, 2].
The newer magnetoelectric units have as many as 10,000 measuring points for incredible accuracy.
Bianisotropic materials are special types of media where the physical parameters properties (permittivity, permeability, and magnetoelectric parameters) are tensors.
In case of Gd[Mn.sub.2][O.sub.5], magnetoelectric effect and spin-lattice coupling are commonly acknowledged in several investigations [4,10, 12,14]; little is known about the correlations between structural distortion and lattice dynamics.