magnetograph

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mag·ne·to·graph

 (măg-nē′tō-grăf′)
n.
A device for detecting and recording variations in the intensity and direction of magnetic fields.

mag·ne′to·gram′ (-grăm′) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

magnetograph

(mæɡˈniːtəʊˌɡrɑːf; -ˌɡræf)
n
(General Physics) a recording magnetometer, usually used for studying variations in the earth's magnetic field
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.magnetograph - a scientific instrument that registers magnetic variations (especially variations of the earth's magnetic field)
scientific instrument - an instrument used by scientists
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(left) A white-light image of the Sun on 23 Oct 2014 showing the largest sunspot observed in over two decades and (right) a simultaneous magnetogram of the same regions.
So, the magnetic field strength at a distance of two-wire line x [greater than or equal to] [r.sub.mm] is described mainly by its first (n = 1) harmonic constructed as illustrated by equation (8) magnetogram in Fig.
Updated on at least a daily basis, the images cover a variety of extreme ultraviolet wavelengths and also include a continuum (white-light) image and a magnetogram that shows the Suns magnetic field and highlights sunspots on the surface you might otherwise miss.
Updated on at least a daily basis, the images come in a variety of extreme ultraviolet wavelengths and also include a continuum (whitelight) image and even a magnetogram. Two coronagraph images show a wider view of the Sun's coronal activity, displaying ejections of matter flying out from the solar surface.
The author would like to thank the Wilcox Solar Observatory for providing open access to the magnetogram data.
While faculae display CLV with respect to their spectral emissivity, their emissivity contrast remains highly associated with the magnetogram signal [59].