maidenhead

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maid·en·head

 (mād′n-hĕd′)
n.
1. Archaic The condition or quality of being a maiden; virginity.
2. The hymen.

[Middle English maidenhed : maiden, maid; see maiden + -hed, -hood.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

maidenhead

(ˈmeɪdənˌhɛd)
n
1. (Anatomy) a nontechnical word for the hymen
2. virginity; maidenhood
[C13: from maiden + -hed, variant of -hood]

Maidenhead

(ˈmeɪdənˌhɛd)
n
(Placename) a town in S England, in Windsor and Maidenhead unitary authority, Berkshire, on the River Thames. Pop: 58 848 (2001)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

maid•en•head

(ˈmeɪd nˌhɛd)

n.
1. hymen.
2. maidenhood; virginity.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.maidenhead - a fold of tissue that partly covers the entrance to the vagina of a virginmaidenhead - a fold of tissue that partly covers the entrance to the vagina of a virgin
mucosa, mucous membrane - mucus-secreting membrane lining all body cavities or passages that communicate with the exterior
imperforate hymen - hymen that is completely closed so that menstrual blood cannot flow out
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

maidenhead

[ˈmeɪdnhed] Nvirginidad f, himen m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
Drink another glass of wine; sha't drink another glass." And, the more to enliven her, he would sometimes sing a merry song, which bore some relation to matrimony and the loss of a maidenhead. Nay, he would have proceeded so far on that topic as to have driven her out of the room, if Mr Allworthy had not checkt him, sometimes by looks, and once or twice by a "Fie!
He and three other men, so he said, were sculling a very heavily laden boat up from Maidenhead one evening, and a little above Cookham lock they noticed a fellow and a girl, walking along the towpath, both deep in an apparently interesting and absorbing conversation.