mailcoach

mailcoach

(ˈmeɪlˌkəʊtʃ) or

mailcar

n
(Railways) a railway coach specially constructed for the transportation of mail
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
On the 20th of August it was known at Marseilles that he had left town in the mailcoach, and then it was said that the bills would go to protest at the end of the month, and that Morrel had gone away and left his chief clerk Emmanuel, and his cashier Cocles, to meet the creditors.
Natalie was found with horrific injuries in a property on the Mailcoach Road in the town on Thursday morning.
BRITAIN'S rural highways were once the haunt of the highwayman, the chap on the big horse with a pair of flintlock pistols, a mask and a tricorn hat, who would hold up the mailcoach with the shout of 'Stand and deliver
BRITAIN''S rural highways were once the haunt of the highwayman, the chap on the big horse with a pair of FLINTLOCK pistols, a masK and a tricorn hat, who would hold up the mailcoach with the shout of "Stand and deliver
World premiere of Honest by DC Moore: The Mailcoach, Northampton.
Once we had finished our day's work, we'd go for long walks in the Steinbachtal--past the old inn where the mailcoach had stopped, the leaves of the chestnut trees in its courtyard filmed with dust, then along the path by the Kneippbad, whose salving waters promised relief to the arthritics who moved in a procession from one pool to the next, and finally on into a mixed forest, hemlock and beech mainly, where we'd sometimes come across an old professor well-known in our corner of Franconia for his pacifist sympathies.
For Hewitt, that split is apparent in a striking misreading Jane Addams makes of a passage from De Quincey's The English MailCoach.
It then went by ship to Marseilles and from there probably to Southampton and then by train to Birmingham via London and then possibly by mailcoach to Alcester.
If you find something by Kozeluk [sic] or anything else that is good and worth engraving, send it to me by the mailcoach to Frankfurt care of Geil & Hadler, music merchants.
Natalie, who was from the village of Easkey but living in Sligo town and working in the local Lidl, was discovered with horrific injuries in a property on Mailcoach Road.
Also on this day: 1784: The first mailcoach ranin Britain -from London to Bristol; 1864: The Red Cross League was granted immunity in time of war at the Geneva Convention; 1902: The British Academy was granted a Royal Charter; 1914: The first British troops arrived in France; 1940: The Battle of Britain began; 1974: President Nixon resigned -he was the first ever American President to do so; 1991: John McCarthy, the journalist held hostage by Islamic Jihad in the Lebanon since 1986, was freed.
A VICTORIAN painting of a London to Coventry mailcoach (right) is expected to fetch thousands of pounds at auction.