maim


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maim

 (mām)
tr.v. maimed, maim·ing, maims
1. To injure, disable, or disfigure, usually by depriving of the use of a limb or other part of the body. See Synonyms at mangle.
2. To make imperfect or defective; impair: "The presumption of innocence has already been maimed ... for foreign Muslims" (Nicholas D. Kristof).

[Middle English maimen, from Old French mahaignier; see mayhem.]

maim′er n.

maim

(meɪm)
vb (tr)
1. to mutilate, cripple, or disable a part of the body of (a person or animal)
2. to make defective
n
obsolete an injury or defect
[C14: from Old French mahaignier to wound, probably of Germanic origin]
maimedness n
ˈmaimer n

maim

(meɪm)

v.t.
1. to deprive of the use of some part of the body, esp. by wounding.
2. to impair; disfigure.
n.
3. Obs. an injury, esp. loss of a limb.
[1250–1300; < Anglo-French, Old French mahaignier, perhaps < Frankish *maithanjan to castrate]
maim′er, n.

maim


Past participle: maimed
Gerund: maiming

Imperative
maim
maim
Present
I maim
you maim
he/she/it maims
we maim
you maim
they maim
Preterite
I maimed
you maimed
he/she/it maimed
we maimed
you maimed
they maimed
Present Continuous
I am maiming
you are maiming
he/she/it is maiming
we are maiming
you are maiming
they are maiming
Present Perfect
I have maimed
you have maimed
he/she/it has maimed
we have maimed
you have maimed
they have maimed
Past Continuous
I was maiming
you were maiming
he/she/it was maiming
we were maiming
you were maiming
they were maiming
Past Perfect
I had maimed
you had maimed
he/she/it had maimed
we had maimed
you had maimed
they had maimed
Future
I will maim
you will maim
he/she/it will maim
we will maim
you will maim
they will maim
Future Perfect
I will have maimed
you will have maimed
he/she/it will have maimed
we will have maimed
you will have maimed
they will have maimed
Future Continuous
I will be maiming
you will be maiming
he/she/it will be maiming
we will be maiming
you will be maiming
they will be maiming
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been maiming
you have been maiming
he/she/it has been maiming
we have been maiming
you have been maiming
they have been maiming
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been maiming
you will have been maiming
he/she/it will have been maiming
we will have been maiming
you will have been maiming
they will have been maiming
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been maiming
you had been maiming
he/she/it had been maiming
we had been maiming
you had been maiming
they had been maiming
Conditional
I would maim
you would maim
he/she/it would maim
we would maim
you would maim
they would maim
Past Conditional
I would have maimed
you would have maimed
he/she/it would have maimed
we would have maimed
you would have maimed
they would have maimed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.maim - injure or wound seriously and leave permanent disfiguration or mutilationmaim - injure or wound seriously and leave permanent disfiguration or mutilation; "people were maimed by the explosion"
injure, wound - cause injuries or bodily harm to
mar, mutilate - destroy or injure severely; "mutilated bodies"
lame, cripple - deprive of the use of a limb, especially a leg; "The accident has crippled her for life"

maim

verb cripple, hurt, injure, wound, mar, disable, hamstring, impair, lame, mutilate, mangle, incapacitate, put out of action One man has lost his life; another has been maimed.

maim

verb
To deprive of a limb or bodily member or its use:
Translations
يَجْدَع، يَبْتُر
zmrzačit
invalidere
megcsonkít
limlesta
sakropļot
sakat bırakmak

maim

[meɪm] VTmutilar, lisiar
to be maimed for lifequedar lisiado de por vida

maim

[ˈmeɪm] vtmutiler

maim

vt (= mutilate)verstümmeln; (= cripple)zum Krüppel machen; the wounded and the maimeddie Verletzten und Versehrten; he will be maimed for lifeer wird sein Leben lang ein Krüppel bleiben; he was maimed in the bomb attackder Bombenanschlag machte ihn zum Krüppel

maim

[meɪm] vtstorpiare, mutilare

maim

(meim) verb
to injure badly, especially with permanent effects. The hunter was maimed for life.

maim

v. mutilar; estropear; lisiar.
References in classic literature ?
"That's always your way, Maim -- always sailing in to help somebody before they're hurt.
And besides all this, there was a certain lofty bearing about the Pagan, which even his uncouthness could not altogether maim. He looked like a man who had never cringed and never had had a creditor.
A WOLF, sorely wounded and bitten by dogs, lay sick and maimed in his lair.
Sometimes, after every two or three mouthfuls, he laid down his knife and fork, and stared at his son with all his might--particularly at his maimed side; then, he looked slowly round the table until he caught some person's eye, when he shook his head with great solemnity, patted his shoulder, winked, or as one may say--for winking was a very slow process with him--went to sleep with one eye for a minute or two; and so, with another solemn shaking of his head, took up his knife and fork again, and went on eating.
There exists a monition of the Bishop of Durham against irregular churchmen of this class, who associated themselves with Border robbers, and desecrated the holiest offices of the priestly function, by celebrating them for the benefit of thieves, robbers, and murderers, amongst ruins and in caverns of the earth, without regard to canonical form, and with torn and dirty attire, and maimed rites, altogether improper for the occasion.
There is defiance in the remaining stumps of her masts, raised up like maimed limbs against the menacing scowl of a stormy sky; there is high courage in the upward sweep of her lines towards the bow; and as soon as, on a hastily-rigged spar, a strip of canvas is shown to the wind to keep her head to sea, she faces the waves again with an unsubdued courage.
With respect to the exposing or bringing up of children, let it be a law, that nothing imperfect or maimed shall be brought up, ..........
Where everything maimed, ill-famed, lustful, untrustful, over-mellow, sickly-yellow and seditious, festereth pernicious:--
Not only on that day, as he rode over the battlefield strewn with men killed and maimed (by his will as he believed), did he reckon as he looked at them how many Russians there were for each Frenchman and, deceiving himself, find reason for rejoicing in the calculation that there were five Russians for every Frenchman.
And how horribly wretched and maimed must their arguments have appeared!
"It is as fatal as a murder or any other horror that divides people," he burst out again; "it is more intolerable--to have our life maimed by petty accidents."
It came to pass, that in the ambergris affair Stubb's after-oarsman chanced so to sprain his hand, as for a time to become quite maimed; and, temporarily, Pip was put into his place.